Scoop Blog Archive / April 2010

The Weekly Must List: March 15 - 21, 2010

Must Welcome
Elliott Bay Book Company Official Opening Read more »


Elliott Bay Book Co.'s Official Opening April 15

Local book lovers, breathe a collective sigh of relief: Elliott Bay Book Company has safely relocated to its cozy, new Capitol Hill location. You can swing into the new shop today or show your love for the 36-year-old bibliophile haunt and cruise down to their opening day block party (co-hosted by Everyday Music) this Thursday. In addition to the food, libations and live music, rumor has it the city even plans to block Tenth Avenue (between Pike and Pine) just for the festivities. Read more »


New Bar Alert: War Room Becomes HG Lodge

Capitol Hill’s the War Room will reopen tonight with a fresh look and a new name. Dubbed HG Lodge, the new space—complete with lots of rock, taxidermy, wood floors and surfaces and a live ivy wall—looks like a hip ski lodge. Like any Capitol Hill bar worth its weight in trendy Northwestern iconography, HG is loaded with outdoorsy Americana decor, including-- yes--taxidermy. Read more »


The Bombshells Go To Bellingham...

I swung by The Atomic Bombshells Wednesday night performance of their new show, The Atomic Bombshells Are... Lost in Outer Space. From a sultry version of the Attack of the 50 Foot Woman to a playfully sexy take on Barbarella, the show was filled with fun references to sci-fi and horror classics. Too bad for Seattleites, tonight's show--the show's final scheduled performance in Seattle--is completely sold out. Read more »


SODO Showgirls Invades Seattle Mag's Space

We've known for a long time that the latest incarnation of Showgirls was moving in next door to the Seattle mag offices in SoDo. We've joked about it (conference room full? let's all go next door!) and complained about it (especially when it looked like h(o.o)ters was going to move in right below us... though now that business seems to have taken their "amazing wings" elsewhere). But today Showgirls turned on their gigantic digital signs—and the hilarity has turned to nausea and vague dread. Read more »