Best Camping Spots in Washington

Whether you prefer authentic camping or luxury "glamping," our camping guide has you covered.

Roughing It
The Northwest offers plenty of ways to commune with nature, but nothing quite surpasses the getting-back-to-the-land feeling of hiking, sleeping and cooking outdoors—especially when s'mores await at the end of a day spent entirely free of walls.

Not-so-Roughing It
If sleeping on the ground—even on a pad in a warm sleeping bag and tent—is more than you can stomach, there are other, more civilized ways to spend the night in the great outdoors (just don’t tell your hard-core hiker pals). 

A Eurovan is the ground-averse camper’s silver bullet. Arts & culture editor Brangien Davis' vamping travel diary.

Going Rogue
For many of us, spending the night in a crowded car campground, even in a beautiful locale, feels like camping in a mall parking lot.

Occupational Hazards
Contributor, avid hiker and mother of two uncomplaining campers, Kristen Russell wants to be sure you know a thing or two about the nature—and perils—of camping in the Northwest before you pitch your tent

Camping With Children
Taking your wild things with you to the wilderness?
Camping with kids presents special problems, so we asked a family-camping veteran—ParentMap’s managing editor, Kristen Russell—for some answers.

Recipe for Delicious Campfire Dessert: Easy Salted Caramel S’mores
A tower of decadent s'mores

Why Olympia's 222 Market is Worth the Trip

Why Olympia's 222 Market is Worth the Trip

Olympia’s new artisan food market puts the capital city on the culinary map
Sofie's Scoops at the 222 Market

Olympians, we apologize for invading your downtown parking. But, an artisan-style food hall like 222 Market (Olympia, 222 Capitol Way N; is an exciting destination and one we food lovers think is worth the drive.

At press time, the 15,000-square-foot building was scheduled to open in September, showcasing artisan food and beverage producers from around the Pacific Northwest, including Broth Bar By Salt Fire & Time; small-batch gelateria Sofie’s Scoops; and the city’s first oyster bar.

The 1940s-era building was originally the home of Olympia’s Packard car dealership and over the years has housed a variety of businesses. But, with renowned bakery The Bread Peddler as an anchor tenant for more than a decade, the building’s owners, Gray and Joy Graham, saw potential for a full-fledged food hall. They partnered with Olympia chef Lela Cross (co-owner of Capitale, Cielo Blu and Dillinger’s Cocktails & Kitchen) to handpick local, independent merchants, including a florist (Fleurae), and then hired green architect firm Artisans Group, which gutted and opened up the building’s interior, repurposing recycled lumber and Douglas fir into tables and countertops.

222 Market certainly plays a vital role in downtown Olympia’s revitalization, but it’s also pretty great for the destination-dining Seattleite. Here’s what to eat.

Photos: Sofie’s Scoops: Sofie Landis; Broth Bar: John Valls; Chelsea Farms Oyster Bar: Courtesy of Chelsea Farms Oyster Bar; Blind Pig Spirits and the Bread Peddler Crepe: Piper Backholm