Best Hikes to See Color Change

Where to enjoy nature in Technicolor.
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Take an easy hike to Technicolor foliage in Heather Meadows near Mount Baker

Heather Meadows
Near Mount Baker

Heather Meadows
Difficulty:
Easy; .5 mile, mostly level and paved 
Location: About two and a half hours from Seattle in the Mount Baker–Snoqualmie National Forest, 56 miles east on State Route 542. Nearest town: Glacier, 23 miles. Northwest Forest Pass required; dogs must be on a leash; fs.usda.gov

Long after the wildflowers fade, vivid color reamins on western Washington trails, especially at Heather Meadows, come September or October. Indeed, the handicapped-accessible half-mile path around Picture Lake near the Mount Baker Ski Area affords views not only of towering Mount Shuksan reflected in the water, but also of Technicolor foliage on the mountain heather, alpine blueberries and other plants crowding the trail’s edge. A small viewing platform with benches and interpretive signs serves as a destination on this lollipop trail. Look for blueberries ripening trailside this month. (But keep your eyes peeled for black bears after the same bounty.) Those looking for more can hit the Chain Lakes Trail or any number of world-class backpacking and climbing routes emanating from Artist Ridge, just a little farther up the road.

 

 

 

Washington Park Arboretum
Seattle

Washington Arboretum
Difficulty:
Easy; length varies, no elevation gain 
Location: On the shores of Lake Washington, just east of Madison Valley 

 depts.washington.edu/uwbg

In just a few months, you can take in stunning fall colors—and your in-city cure for nature deficit disorder—on a simple outing to Seattle’s living lung: the Washington Park Arboretum. With 230 acres of wetlands, woodlands and walking trails—and a world-renowned collection of trees—you’ll find fall-color heaven, with fiery Japanese maple, golden-yellow larches and ash, and oak trees replete with acorns (and frantically happy squirrels), along with more than 10,000 other plants and trees from around the world. Admission to all but the Japanese Garden is free; download a trail map at depts.washington.edu/uwbg, or join one of the free guided tours that leave from the Graham Visitors Center every Sunday at 1 p.m., January–November.

 

Lake Ingalls
Alpine Lakes Wilderness 

Lake Ingalls
Difficulty:
Moderate; 9 miles round-trip, 2,500-foot elevation gain 
Location: About a two-and-a-half-hour drive from Seattle in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, via Interstate 90 and Teanaway Road. Nearest town: Cle Elum, 31.5 miles. Northwest Forest Pass required; dogs prohibited; wta.org 

While the hike up to Lake Ingalls, just inside the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, is wondrous any time of year, veteran leaf peepers save it for October, when the subalpine larches at the treeline and around the water’s edge glow with golden needles, ideally against a backdrop of freshly fallen snow. The lake itself can exaggerate the day’s mood—sparkling and beckoning under blue skies or foreboding and spooky under dark clouds. Serrated Mount Stuart seems to peek out of nowhere, like a next-door neighbor peering over a fence to keep the lake company. This is the high country indeed; Lake Ingalls itself is above 6,000 feet in elevation, as your thighs will no doubt be reporting after making the climb.

Why Olympia's 222 Market is Worth the Trip

Why Olympia's 222 Market is Worth the Trip

Olympia’s new artisan food market puts the capital city on the culinary map
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Sofie's Scoops at the 222 Market

Olympians, we apologize for invading your downtown parking. But, an artisan-style food hall like 222 Market (Olympia, 222 Capitol Way N; 222market.com) is an exciting destination and one we food lovers think is worth the drive.

At press time, the 15,000-square-foot building was scheduled to open in September, showcasing artisan food and beverage producers from around the Pacific Northwest, including Broth Bar By Salt Fire & Time; small-batch gelateria Sofie’s Scoops; and the city’s first oyster bar.

The 1940s-era building was originally the home of Olympia’s Packard car dealership and over the years has housed a variety of businesses. But, with renowned bakery The Bread Peddler as an anchor tenant for more than a decade, the building’s owners, Gray and Joy Graham, saw potential for a full-fledged food hall. They partnered with Olympia chef Lela Cross (co-owner of Capitale, Cielo Blu and Dillinger’s Cocktails & Kitchen) to handpick local, independent merchants, including a florist (Fleurae), and then hired green architect firm Artisans Group, which gutted and opened up the building’s interior, repurposing recycled lumber and Douglas fir into tables and countertops.

222 Market certainly plays a vital role in downtown Olympia’s revitalization, but it’s also pretty great for the destination-dining Seattleite. Here’s what to eat.


Photos: Sofie’s Scoops: Sofie Landis; Broth Bar: John Valls; Chelsea Farms Oyster Bar: Courtesy of Chelsea Farms Oyster Bar; Blind Pig Spirits and the Bread Peddler Crepe: Piper Backholm