Closet Rx Solves the 'Nothing to Wear' Problem with Organization

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!--paging_filter--pIt’s a statement uttered by many people while staring into the closet: “I have nothing to wear.” It’s also a sentiment that Barbara Malone and Julienne Kuttel, proprietors of closet-organization and personal-style consulting company Closet Rx (Capitol Hill, 501 E Pike St.; 206.660.3456; a href="http://www.closetrx.com" target="_blank"closetrx.com/a), believe is usually untrue. “People are often blind to what they have because their closet isn’t organized correctly,” Malone explains. After years of unofficially curating their friends’ closets, the two long-time comrades brought their skills to the masses last spring, opening Closet Rx with three simple principles in mind: renew, reuse and refuse. The renewal and refusal aspects start in your own boudoir, with the closet doctors arriving with racks in hand to review, edit and analyze your wardrobe (starting at $75/hour). “It’s amazing what a little organization will do. I love seeing clients find confidence in their clothes again,” says Malone, who also, with her husband, co-owns the Sorrento Hotel. Have holes in your style repertoire? Malone and Kuttel will make recommendations or take you on a personal shopping and styling mission ($75/hour) to flesh it out. Have top-quality pieces that no longer work for you? The duo will sell your retired goods—at 40 to 75 percent off retail—at their Capitol Hill shop, where savvy thrifters are welcomed on Saturdays from noon to 4 p.m. or by appointment.nbsp;/p

 

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