Designer to Watch: Moorea Seal

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Tangletown-based jewelry artist Moorea Seal first viewed art on a grand scale as an artist’s assistant to Seattle sculptor John Grade, helping to craft his large-scale installations. But in 2010, the Seattle Pacific University graduate began packing big, geometric sculptures into a petite form: jewelry.

Combining her artistic background and influences from her rural England and northern California upbringing, Seal’s creations blur the lines between sleek urbanity and rugged nature, with oversized, raw amethyst druzy rings ($37–$55), chevron-cut leather earrings ($25) and gold boho headpieces ($55). “I really enjoy pairing rough materials like leather and crystals with clean lines and shapes,” says the 26-year-old. “The result is very bohemian chic, statement worthy and wearable.”

This month, in addition to a new, very texture-heavy jewelry collection, the increasingly popular designer (she is ranked in the top 48 overall in the world for Pinterest followers) will also launch a line of leather handbags with a collection of five new styles ($75–$120) incorporating her latest nature obsession, animal prints.

Available at Butter Home on Capitol Hill or mooreaseal.etsy.com.

 

 

Nordstrom's Retail Therapy: Shopping for Change

Nordstrom's Retail Therapy: Shopping for Change

Nordstrom is more than just a department store; for many, it’s also a flagship of progressive Seattle values. (Oh, and there’s a sale this weekend)
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Seattle's flagship Nordstrom department store

For many Seattleites and their families, a visit to Nordstrom is not the average shopping trip. It’s often an all-day affair, rife with game plans, important decisions and breaks for meals (and cocktails), much like a visit to Grandma’s. Indeed, a trip to “Nordy’s” is a cherished family tradition in line with the family focus of the company, still run with the help of a fourth generation of Nordstroms.  

Despite its success and national expansion, the Seattle-based luxury retailer still operates very much like a small business, and is beloved for its customer-focused business model. Shoppers can count on excellent service from well-commissioned sales reps (including on-site personal stylists), the most forgiving of return policies (the one rule of Nordstrom’s return policy is there is no return policy), a plethora of sizes and styles and sales galore. Not to mention in-store amenities like its signature café and cocktail bar. Best of all, the store always waits until after Thanksgiving to put up holiday decorations. (Anyone for a Nordstrom-based remake of Where the Heart Is? Anyone? No?)

Earlier this month, when the company dropped Ivanka Trump’s line of shoes and handbags from its inventory (a decision the retailer cited was due to poor sales), many viewed it as a testament to Nordstrom’s promise to put family first, and a nod to its founder, John W. Nordstrom, who himself immigrated to the U.S. from Sweden in 1887, when he was just 16.

Progressive Seattleites rallied further when this company memo followed Trump’s executive order to temporarily bar citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., a portion of which reads: “We currently employ more than 76,000 people who comprise different races, ethnicities and genders. We literally have thousands of employees who are first and second generation immigrants. Every one of your unique qualities brings a richness that allows us to better reflect and serve the multi-cultured communities we’re a part of.”

Despite a Twitter backlash from Ivanka’s commander-in-chief dad, Nordstrom’s shares continue to climb, and shoppers across the nation have publically ramped up their support of the department store.

Did we mention there’s a sale this weekend? Nordstrom’s first sale of the year, the Nordstrom Winter Sale, starts today in stores and online and runs through February 26th. Take up to 40% off your favorite styles for men, women and kids.

Grab your family and friends and keep the tradition going—and, as Nordstrom’s slogan reminds us, don’t be afraid to reinvent yourself.