The Doctors on the Cover of Seattle Magazine’s '2014 Top Doctors' Issue Get Candid

top doctors seattle magazine 2014
Pictured left to right: Kathleen C. Y. Sie, M.D., Marquis Hart, M.D., Alison Lytle Perrin, M.D., and David Y. Kim, M.D.

We asked our cover doctors a number of questions, everything from how they knew they had chosen the right vocation to lessons they wish their patients would take to heart. Read on for more insight from these top-notch docs.

Marquis Hart, M.D.

Surgeon; Director, Organ Transplant Program, Swedish Medical Center

Why did you pick your specialty?
The care of patients with organ disease requiring transplantation requires you to integrate everything that I learned in Medical school including: physiology, anatomy pathology, microbiology and immunology.

What experience or case convinced you that you made the right decision?
My very first case as a fellow convinced me that this is what I wanted to do. The operation lasted 24 hours and required many units of blood to support due to what is called “primary graft non-function”. The next day we re-transplanted the patient and he lived. I had no idea that this was humanly possible.

What is one lesson you wish your patients would take to heart?
To have hope even when the odds are against your survival.

What would make the biggest difference in their lives?
To seek care from their primary care provider and get regular screening.

If you could change one thing about how we deliver health care, what would it be?
Provide the best care for all regardless of financial ability.

What is the most important recent development in your field?
There is now a cure for Hepatitis C.

What have you learned by directing the Organ Transplant Program at Swedish Medical Center that you wouldn't have learned had you not taken this administrative role?
I have learned that Swedish and Providence leadership are committed to caring for all patients

 



Kathleen C. Y. Sie, M.D.

Pediatric otolaryngologist, Pediatric, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Director, Seattle Children’s Childhood Communication Center

 

Why did you pick your specialty?
I was drawn to pediatric otolaryngology because we deal with so many important functions including breathing, swallowing, communication, hearing and speech. Helping children with problems in any of these areas makes a huge difference for them. I focus on seeing patients with communication issues related to speech and hearing.

What experience or case convinced you that you made the right decision?
When I was just starting my practice, I performed a surgery for a young girl (who had normal hearing) so that she could speak more clearly. Several months after the surgery, her mother wrote me a note to tell me that the surgery had changed the way her daughter interacted with her classmates on the playground—she had changed from a ‘shy’ girl to a talkative, confident and outgoing girl. The story made me realize that helping children communicate affects them in ways that are hard to capture with traditional medical metrics.

What would make the biggest difference in the lives of the children you see?
Overall, eliminating poverty and improving maternal education makes the biggest difference for children. With regard to medical care, I think that educating children and families about health and eliminating barriers to health care will make the biggest difference for children.

If you could change one thing about how we deliver health care, what would it be?
I wish we could eliminate the unnecessary waste in medicine so that more children could receive the services they need.

What motivated you to maintain both an academic and a clinical practice?
Developing a relationship with and taking care of patients and their families is incredibly gratifying. But I realized that it is so important to perform research and to teach young doctors so that treatments and interventions will continue to get better. I think being an active clinician helps inform my academic work and vice versa. Both are so valuable.

What is the most important recent development in your field?
The implementation of Early Hearing Detection Diagnosis and Intervention (newborn hearing screening) has decreased the average age of diagnosis of congenital hearing loss from 2.5 years to about 7 months of age. The earlier identification of childhood hearing loss gives families the opportunity to make language accessible to their children. The earlier identification opens the door for earlier interventions and improved outcomes.