Langdon Cook's Stinging Nettle Paneer Recipe

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!--paging_filter--p3/4 pound paneer, cut into cubesbr 1 large onionbr 3 to 4 cloves garlicbr 1 4-inch thumb of ginger, peeledbr 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil, plus extra for frying paneerbr 3 to 4 cardamom pods, crushedbr 1/2 teaspoon cumin seedsbr 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamonbr 1/8 teaspoon ground clovesbr 1 to 2 plum tomatoes, dicedbr 20 ounces boiled nettles, drainedbr 1/2 teaspoon turmericbr 1 teaspoon ground cuminbr 1 teaspoon ground corianderbr 1 heaping teaspoon garam masalabr 1 teaspoon black pepperbr 1 to 2 teaspoons saltbr 1 cup,nbsp;more or less,nbsp;heavy cream or yogurt or a mix of the twobr cilantro for garnishbr br 1. In a food processor, pulverize the onion, garlic and ginger into paste.br br 2. Over medium heat, sauté paste in oil for a few minutes in heavy-bottomed saucepan. Add cumin seeds, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves and tomatoes, and cook for a minute or two, stirring occasionally.br br 3. Squeeze out excess water in boiled nettles. You’ll have a clump about the size of a baseball. Chop up by hand or with a food processor; I like mine well chopped, but not pulverized.br br 4. Add nettles to pan, along with turmeric, cumin, coriander,nbsp;garam masala,nbsp;black pepper and salt. Stir together well.br br 5. Meanwhile, fry a href="http://fat-of-the-land.blogspot.com/2011/03/wild-indian-stinging-nettle-..." target="_blank"paneer cubes/a in a little oil until lightly browned, then add to nettle mixture just before serving.br br 6. Finish over low heat with heavy cream or yogurt to desired consistency. Garnish with fresh cilantro.brbrRead Cook's a href="http://www.seattlemag.com/article/forager-langdon-cook-rediscovering-out..." target="_blank"full story on rediscovering the charms of the great outdoors in 2014/a./p