Mid-century Modern Homes

Mid-century modern houses are architecturally en vogue—so much so that in Seattle, people are willin
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Epitomized by the work of influential California architects Charles and Ray Eames and real estate developer Joseph Eichler, mid-century modern homes took root in Seattle when the city was expanding beyond its core into neighborhoods such as Magnolia, View Ridge and West Seattle. “The mid-century design was a move away from traditional, compartmentalized floor plans,” says local real estate agent Mark Potvin (gbk.com) “and into more open plans that make small homes feel bigger.” The emphasis here is on function rather than fanciness, with simple lines, small bedrooms (intended only for sleeping) and plenty of windows to bring the outside in.

“These houses flow like we live today—less formal, more comfortable, more organic,” Potvin says. “And the beauty of this 60-year-old design is that it lends itself easily to remodels. It doesn’t take much to make a classic midcentury modern home feel contemporary.” As in many cities, these houses are currently in vogue in Seattle. “People will pay a premium for midcentury homes,” says Potvin. “They’re the darlings of the market.”

Magnolia
List price: $1,545,000
Square footage: 3,100; 5 bedrooms/2.5 bathrooms
Year built: 1956
Property size: 9,408 square feet
Property taxes: $9,514
Bonus: Beachfront property with views of the Ballard locks, boats and sea life
Date listed: 2/2012

 

Seward Park
List price: $949,000
Square footage: 4,362; 5 bedrooms/4.5 baths
Year built: 1951
Property size: 11,837 sq ft
Property taxes: $7,174
Bonus: Updated brick rambler with views of Lake Washington and a meticulously landscaped yard
Date Listed: 2/2012

Blue Ridge
List price: $1,700,000
Square footage: 4,373; 5 bedrooms, 2.75 baths
Year built: 1951
Property size: 10,018 sq ft
Property taxes: $10,543
Bonus: Fully remodeled with a black-bottom swimming pool and Zen garden
Date Listed: 1/2012

Note: Some or all of these homes may have sold since publication. Listings and data courtesy of Zillow (zillow.com).


Recipe of the Week: Kale Gougères

Recipe of the Week: Kale Gougères

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These delicate, one-bite appetizers set the tone for a festive night

Recipe of the Week is contributed by Seattle-based award-winning cookbook author, urban farmer and Seattle magazine contributor Amy Pennington.

The holiday season is a lovely time for inviting friends and loved ones into your home and putting out a wow-worthy spread of nibbles and meals. This year, bypass the usual towering platters of cheese and charcuterie and mix it up by offering gougère. This egg-based, cooked dough is easy to make and infinitely affordable, making them a no brainer for any budget.

These delicate, one-bite appetizers set the tone for a festive night. The dough can be made well in advance and frozen, allowing eager hosts to bake them just before serving. The addition of finely diced kale adds some healthy green to this petite, savory snack. This easy, fast-cooking nosh comes together quickly—you’ll have them made, shaped and baked in about half an hour. 


Kale Gougères

Excerpted from Fresh Pantry, Skipstone Publishing
MAKES ABOUT 2 DOZEN

1 cup water
6 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
¾ cup all-purpose flour
4 eggs
Zest of 1 lemon
3 kale leaves, blanched, squeezed dry, and finely chopped (about ½ cup)
2 green onions, finely chopped

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. In a large saucepan, bring the water, butter, salt, and nutmeg to a boil over high heat. Remove the pan from the stovetop and stir in the flour until well combined. Reduce the heat to medium-high and return the saucepan to the stovetop. Mix the dough, continually and vigorously, until it comes together in a smooth, sticky mass and starts to pull away from the sides of the saucepan, about 2 to 3 minutes.

Remove the saucepan from the heat and immediately add the eggs, one at a time, by beating quickly with a wooden spoon, until all the eggs are incorporated. Stir in the zest, kale, and green onions until well combined.

Transfer the dough to a pastry bag fitted with a large 1/ 2-inch tip. You may also use a plastic bag, with the corner cut off to form a small hole. Pipe rounds of dough onto a parchment-lined baking sheet, about 1-inch wide (make sure their edges don’t touch). You may also drop small rounds of dough using a small spoon. Bake the gougères until golden brown, about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and serve immediately.

If not serving these immediately, freeze rounds of dough on baking sheets and, once frozen, store them in a resealable plastic bag in the freezer until ready to use.

PANTRY NOTE: Depending on your tastes, try these with grated cheese— sharp cheddar or Gruyère work equally well. Add a filling to these gougères for an even more delicious snack; flavored cream cheese, a smoked fish paste, or puréed vegetables make delicious fillings. Pipe in the filling of choice as if you were filling a donut and serve immediately. Leftover gougères hold in an airtight container for about two days before going stale.