Spring Arts Preview 2014: Visual Arts Events

Painters, photographers and sculptors work visual magic
FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

!--paging_filter--pstrong[Painting]/strongbrBorn in Astoria, Oregon, and based in northern California, painter Eric Zener is a master of the photorealist style, creating stunningly vibrant images, often of people underwater (pictured above) or in other personal sanctuaries. 5/1–5/30. Times vary. Free. Foster White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S; 206.622.2833;a href="http://www.fosterwhite.com" target="_blank" fosterwhite.com/a brbr /
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brstrong[Painting]/strongbrThe scribbly “white writing” covering legendary Northwest artist Mark Tobey’s dense, abstract paintings was highly influenced by Asian calligraphy. In Mark Tobey and Teng Baiye: Seattle/Shanghai, the influence of Chinese artist Teng Baiye, Tobey’s close friend and contemporary, becomes immensely clear. Through 5/25. Times vary. Free. Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave.; 206.622.9250; a href="http://www.fryemuseum.org" target="_blank"fryemuseum.org/a brbrstrong[Photography]/strongbrSeattle photographer Chris Engman re-envisions, reframes and recreates landscapes, such as the spray of beach pebbles he photographed, numbered, re-installed at his studio and photographed again. 4/3–5/17. Times vary. Free. Greg Kucera Gallery, 212 Third Ave. S; 206.624.0770; a href="http://www.gregkucera.com" target="_blank"gregkucera.com/abrstrongbr[Painting]/strongbrBrooklyn-based artist Martin Wittfooth’s striking paintings place wild animals in surreal scenarios—a pelican gulping pearls, a tiger atop a junker car—that seem both absurd and entirely possible. 5/1–5/31. Times vary. Free. Roq La Rue Gallery, 532 First Ave. S; 206.374.8977; a href="http://www.roqlarue.com" target="_blank"roqlarue.com/abrbrstrong[Various]/strongbrThe first exhibition outside of Japan focused on Japanese art of this style, Deco Japan: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920–1945 features 200 paintings, sculptures, ceramics and other examples. Blending traditional Asian motifs with recognizable machine-age geometry, the works lend fresh perspective on how this design movement played out around the globe. 5/10–10/19. Times and prices vary. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E Prospect St.; 206.654.3100; a href="http://www.seattleartmuseum.org" target="_blank"seattleartmuseum.org/a/p
pstrong[Videos]/strongbrWinner of the Henry Gallery’s 2013 Brink Award for emerging Northwest artists, Seattle’s Anne Fenton is an artist whose video work echoes photography—staging a paused moment that loops in the memory. 3/1–6/15. Times and prices vary. Henry Art Gallery, 15th Avenue NE and 41st Street; 206.543.2280; a href="http://www.henryart.org" target="_blank"henryart.org/a/p
pstrong[Sculpture]/strongbrSeattle sculptor Dan Webb works wonders with maple and fir, carving rough blocks of wood into nuanced, liquid and often witty forms. See his shrouded heads, dandelions, balloons and new work in the 15-year retrospective Fragile Fortress. 3/7–6/15. Times and prices vary. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way NE; 425.519.0770; a href="http://www.bellevuearts.org" target="_blank"bellevuearts.org/abrbr /
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brbrstrongimg src="/sites/default/files/newfiles/camillepatha_punch.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 10px;" height="399" width="400"[Painting]/strongbrNorthwest artist Camille Patha was a pioneer of West Coast Surrealism, adapting the edgy abstraction of the 1960s to her feminist point of view. Witness her vigorous use of hues in A Punch of Color, a 50-year retrospective. Through 5/25. Times and prices vary. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave.; 253.272.4258; a href="http://www.tacomaartmuseum.org" target="_blank"tacomaartmuseum.org/a em(Photo: Courtesy of Tacoma Art Museum)/em/p

Bruce Pavitt's New App, 8Stem, Makes You the DJ

Bruce Pavitt's New App, 8Stem, Makes You the DJ

Sub Pop's Bruce Pavitt has a new app that puts anyone in the producer's seat
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8Stem creative director Bruce Pavitt (foreground) and CEO Adam Farish in their Capitol Hill office: Sub Pop’s 25 million record sales were just a start

Sub Pop cofounder Bruce Pavitt knows times have changed since he launched Seattle’s billion-dollar music revolution in the ’80s. Today’s kids prefer gizmos to guitars, and technology gives them easy ways to do it all, from making music to producing it. Pavitt’s new company, 8Stem, offers music fans a free, easy-as-Instagram iPhone app by that name. It turns everyone into a producer, able to delete and add new tracks on existing recordings: lead, bass, drums, instruments, synthesized vocals, beats. Kids addicted to gaming and tech can now listen interactively, erasing part of a tune by Soundgarden’s Kim Thayil—one of 40 artists who license music to 8Stem—and recording their own sounds over Thayil’s, and then sharing it with the touch of a button, so others can remix it at will. “We live in a remix culture,” says Pavitt. “If you go to YouTube, type in any pop song, then add ‘remix,’ the remixes are going to exceed the listeners of the original song.” Pavitt and his tech-exec partner Adam Farish designed 8Stem to cash in on that trend. 

Artists whose music is part of the remix benefit financially thanks to Dubset, a new “fingerprint” technology that scans remixes and detects music owned by any of the 14,000 labels and publishers it has deals with, then makes sure the various owners of the rights are paid. “We just inked a deal with Dubset,” says Pavitt, “and our first track was on Spotify, ‘Sleep In’ by Telekinesis.” 8Stem user Anomie Belle, a noted Seattle musician, added her vocals to the song and put the new version on Spotify; Telekinesis, 8Stem and remixer Belle all get a slice of the profit—and you can, too.

About 30 of 8Stem’s 40 artists are from Seattle, though a few are from London, Argentina and New York City. “We’re trying to reignite the local culture so it’s an energy source for new music and fresh ideas that can go anywhere,” says Pavitt, who used that very technique to conquer the world at Sub Pop. 


Need to Know

1. As a student at The Evergreen State College, Pavitt used $50 and a crayon to create Sub Pop as a fanzine for credit in 1979, made it a record company, and then sold 49 percent of it to Warner Music Group for $20 million in 1995. 

2. Pavitt’s spirited teen pals in his hometown of Park Forest, Illinois, included Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto, who followed him to Seattle and started Soundgarden, and Tom Zutaut, who discovered Enya, Motley Crue and Guns N’ Roses, featuring Seattle’s Duff McKagan.

3. Pavitt predicts that streaming music, including songs remixed on his new 8Stem app, will jump from a $4 billion market today to $16 billion in 2020.  

4. Farish (above, right) cofounded SmartAmerica Home Automation, owns Orcas Island’s Outlook Inn, made two albums and toured America as an electronic dance music DJ.