Suzy Fairchild: Best Everyday Frocks

FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

The line: Formerly a women’s wear and accessories designer at Nordstrom before opening her Frock Shop boutique in 2006, Fairchild lets both the pattern and originating era of the fabric breathe life into her exceedingly wearable skirts and girly yet refined day dresses (often offered for less than $125). “I love the silhouettes and styles of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s; my designs are a mishmash of those eras. I like to take really feminine details from these eras, but then reenvision them; it’s not replication as much as a re-imagining for the modern woman.”

Creative spark: “Frankly, I’m a vintage-fabric hog,” says the 39-year-old, who attended fashion school in London, England. “I scour for it online, and trade with other designers; I’m a real textile person, and am obsessed with prints and patterns.”

Her muse: “In my head, she’s a composite of Michelle Williams, Zooey Deschanel and Carey Mulligan—a quirky ingénue type who likes vintage things and wants to look cute and fabulous at the same time.”

Mission statement: “Get dressed up, sweetie!”

Biggest fashion faux pas: “There are just so many! I mean, I was a teenager in the ’80s. I used to wear this loud patchwork blazer and matching peasant skirt in this terrible print. It was a look, though it was all from The Limited, so it must have been in style at the time. But now I look back and all I can remember is oversized shoulder pads.”

Favorite fashion trend: “I love lace! That’s a big one. The other is prints of animals, like birds and horses. I’m very enthralled by cat prints this fall. During that whole ‘put a bird on it’ phase, I felt like I had an aviary for a while in the store—but now the cats are coming in to eat the birds.”

How personal style influences her designs: “Most of what I make I would wear; my favorite uniform is a skirt paired with a jacket. I like to keep both my style and my designs very feminine. Nothing is stuffy or overdesigned, just garments you’ll feel and look great in.”

Line: Suzy Fairchild

Find it: The Frock Shop in Phinney Ridge (6500 Phinney Ave. N; 206.297.1638; shopfrockshop.com) or suzyfairchild.com

Clothing shown (From left to right): Polka-dot-printed, cotton button-down “Dotty Ruffle” dress with flutter sleeves, gathered ruffle skirt and inseam pockets; sleeveless tulip-printed vintage cotton “Bloomfield” dress with full skirt, inseam pockets and contrasting black cotton band trimming. Fairchild wears her own designs, a black cotton eyelet wrap dress with short sleeves and full skirt, and a large pink Italian silk flower fascinator with black feather trim; shoes are her own. Cap sleeve dot-print cotton/Lycra shirtwaist dot dress with patch pockets on bodice and skirt and contrasting piping throughout.

 

2016 Cookbook Gift Guide

2016 Cookbook Gift Guide

Three essential local culinary guides for holiday gift giving
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

COOKBOOK OF THE YEAR: Chef John Sundstrom is one of the Pacific Northwest’s culinary icons, winner of the James Beard Award for best Northwest chef in 2007 and a semifinalist for outstanding chef in 2014. His latest cookbook, Lark: Cooking Wild in the Northwest (Sasquatch, $30), published in August, is an updated version of 2013’s self-published Lark: Cooking Against the Grain. But, in addition to the rustic Northwest takes on French-themed classics that put the consistently great First Hill restaurant on the map—bacon-wrapped quail, mustard-roasted chicken, silky Meyer lemon parfaits—the new paperback version includes a chapter on Sundstrom’s favorite everyday staples: recipes for pasta, ricotta, vinaigrettes, breads, syrups and pickles. To some, the cover, with its haunting image, looks more like the cover of a book by Bainbridge Island author David Guterson than that of a cookbook. But the contents? One word: essential. 



SOUTHERN COMFORT
: Fancy yourself a baker? Big Food Big Love: Down-Home Southern Cooking Full of Heart from Seattle’s Wandering Goose (Sasquatch, $25) will send you running for your mixer. The new cookbook by North Carolina native and Capitol Hill restaurateur Heather Earnhardt features 130 recipes, including ones offering up the secrets to her towering layer cakes, like the top-selling Brownstone Front Cake; brunch favorites worthy of those long weekend lines, including the famed corned beef brisket bubble and squeak; and comforting dinner favorites, such as Loaded Chicken Pot Pie and Smoky Meat Collards. Did we mention Earnhardt shares all 10 of her biscuit recipes? Now that’s Southern hospitality.  



THE ULTIMATE COCKTAIL GUIDE
: In The Canon Cocktail Book: Recipes from the Award-Winning Bar (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $28), owner-bartender Jamie Boudreau spills the beans on what has made First Hill’s Canon: Whiskey and Bitters Emporium one of the world’s 50 best bars, according to Drinks International magazine (it consistently makes Esquire’s lists as well). Instead of clamoring for one of the bar’s coveted 32 seats, tuck into Boudreau’s 352-page book which features all of Canon’s signature cocktails, from the stenciled Banksy Sour (with Peychaud’s bitters) to the smoky Khaleesi cocktail. Boudreau reveals his “golden ratio” cocktail philosophy and promises you won’t need his $1 million whiskey collection or a trace of liquid nitrogen to wow your friends.