Vacation Getaways: Cozy Cabins

Seek out the serenity and privacy that comes with renting one of these classic log cabins.
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TIMBER LODGE

Orcas Island

(Shown above.) Soak in the sweeping view in peace from the deck of this home; after all, you haven’t just rented a three-story, four-bedroom, 3,100-square-foot Pacific Northwest log cabin near Rosario, you’ve rented the 3 acres it sits on (including the waterfall!). The warm, very rustic and very spacious cabin is big enough to sleep 10 (with a “guestroom” tepee on site); a home theater room includes leather movie-theater seats, a 105-inch screen and surround sound.

Open year around. $200–$600/night, depending on season and amenities. On Orcas Island via I-5 north and the Anacortes ferry, Eastsound, 445 Lindsay Way; 800.418.7990; timberlodgeorcas.com —K.R.



LAKEDALE LOG CABINS

San Juan Island

Tucked along the shores of two little spring-water lakes near Friday Harbor are six cozy yet spacious two-bedroom, two-bathroom real log cabins, each with a full kitchen, a gas fireplace, DVD (but no Wi-Fi) and a cedar deck. The cabins are part of Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes, an 82-acre resort complex that sports a 10-room lodge, canvas “glamping” tents and campsites, too, so you can go up or down on the luxe scale as you please.
Open year around unless closed by snow in January or February. $249–$409 with a two-night minimum. On San Juan Island via I-5 north and the Anacortes ferry. Friday Harbor, 4313 Roche Harbor Road; 800.617.2267; lakedale.com/logcabins.php —K.R.

 

IRON SPRINGS RESORT CABINS

Copalis, on the Olympic Peninsula

With 25 sleek, wood-sided cabins to choose from, you might have trouble deciding. We’ll help: Tiny cabin Number 5 has just one bedroom and a wood stove—and one singular view, which makes it one of the most romantic cabins we’ve ever seen. Toss in a beach walk, the pounding of the surf and a bonfire in the sand, and you’ve got the makings of a memorable weekend, indeed.
Open year around. $149–$299. About three hours southwest of Seattle near Ocean Shores, via I-5 and State Route 109. Copalis Beach, 3707 Highway 109; 800.380.7950; ironspringsresort.com —K.R.

 

PATTERSON LAKE CABINS

Methow Valley

Revel in all the amenities of Sun Mountain Lodge (without the 100 or so lodge-mates!) by renting one of 16 cabins on nearby Patterson Lake. These luxury one- or two-story shingled cabins are staggered lakeside, ensuring everyone gets a view. Each cabin comes with air conditioning, a full kitchen, a gas-powered stone fireplace and a large front porch. In summer, cabin dwellers get first dibs on rowboat, kayak, paddleboat, canoe and Sunfish rentals right outside, while wintertime visitors can ski around Patterson Lake on the way to accessing the resort’s 40-plus miles of Nordic trails.
Open year around. $205–$885. More than four hours from Seattle in summer, more than five hours in winter (due to seasonal closure of State Route 20). Winthrop (outskirts), 604 Patterson Lake Rd.; 509.996.2211; sunmountainlodge.com —R.S.

 

SNOWLINE CABIN

Near Mount Baker

Do a face plant into mountain adventure with this well-situated Mount Baker log cabin, located just past the tiny hamlet of Glacier (population 211) in Snowline, a gated resort community. This rustic two-bedroom log house is an ideal base camp for pursuing mountain adventures year around. About 17 miles from the Mount Baker Ski area, there is also Nordic skiing, hiking, snowmobiling and excellent sledding hills nearby.
Open year around. $199–$299. About two and a half hours northeast of Seattle via I-5 and Highway 542. mtbakerlodging.com —K.R.

Dig Deep Into Wine at the Northwest Wine Encounter

Dig Deep Into Wine at the Northwest Wine Encounter

An intimate affair for wine lovers who get their geek on over things like the impact of soil, weather, terroir and altitude
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A flight of wine awaiting tasting at one of the educational panels

If you love good wine—really good wine—you’ll want to put Northwest Wine Encounter on your radar.

Haven’t heard of it before? That’s not surprising. The inaugural event, which I attended last spring, was an intimate affair with space for just a few dozen wine lovers who got their geek on over things like the impact of soil, weather, terroir and altitude on winemaking, learning about these during educational panels led by some of the region’s finest winemakers. And, of course, it helped to taste through flights of really fine wine as the winemakers offered insights and perspective.

The return engagement, on the weekend of April 28-30 (from $485/person including lodging, events and gala dinner), will follow a similar format and will once again be held at Semiahmoo Resort, a lovely spot overlooking Semiahmoo Bay, with the U.S./Canadian border and Peace Arch in view across the water. This year, there will be room for around 100 wine lovers (sign up for Northwest Wine Encounter here).


Winemakers and guests enjoying Friday night’s bonfire at Semiahmoo 

This quintessential Northwest location was chosen to complement the local wines that are the focus of the weekend. At Semiahmoo, Mount Baker frames the view in one direction, the San Juan Islands and Puget Sound in another. At one time in its history, Semiahmoo was also the site of a salmon cannery. Hard to get more Northwest than that.

The 2017 winemaker lineup includes a few superstars from Oregon and Washington: Chris Figgins of Leonetti Cellars, Walla Walla’s oldest winery; David Merfeld of Northstar Winery, Chris Upchurch of DeLille Cellars; Tony Rynders of Panther Creek and wine grower Mike Sauer of Red Willow Vineyards. New this year is the addition of a British Columbia winemaker, Walter Gehriner of Gehringer Brothers Estate Winery.

 

At last year’s events, the panel discussions were interesting, but the Friday night kick-off event was almost worth the price of admission alone. It had the air of an informal party where everyone was enjoying each other’s company. All the winemakers were in attendance, pouring and chatting about what they love most: making wine. The party eventually spilled out onto the beach where a bonfire warmed the crowd. Marshmallows optional, wine required.