What Piece of Workout Gear Motivates Doctors to Get Moving?

We asked doctors what piece of equipment they never leave home without
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

Squeezing some—or any—exercise into a packed day can be a challenge. Keeping essentials on hand—running shoes under the desk or a Fitbit on your wrist—can help make the most of free moments. We asked sports medicine doctors and other active physicians for inspiration: What is the one piece of workout gear or sports equipment that you won’t leave home without?


“I always have my swimsuit and goggles and a change of clothes. I have a bum knee from sports injury, so swimming is my main form of exercise now.”
—Edward G. Blahous Jr., DPM, podiatrist, University of Washington Sports Medicine Clinic, Ballard


“Breathable, water-resistant reflective gear. (I run in the wee hours of the morning or late at night and do not wish to become roadkill.)” —Michele L. Arnold, M.D., medical director, Swedish Spine, Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine



“I never leave the house without my Fitbit. I have the fancy Tory Burch bracelet to hold the transponder to make it look more dressy at work. More importantly, I have a yoga mat and running shoes stashed just about everywhere so I never have an excuse not to work out. I often unroll the yoga mat at work during lunch and practice for 15–20 minutes.”
—Karen Oppenheimer, M.D., internal medicine, The Polyclinic Downtown



“Swimsuit, goggles, running shoes, gym clothes and towel. I can always find a pool, lake, river or ocean to swim. Running trails are everywhere, as are gyms.” —Mark D. Wagner, M.D., family and sports medicine, University of Washington Sports Medicine Clinic, Ballard



“I never leave home without my iPhone with my Strava and Audible apps. These allow me to track my distance/pace/heart rate while also allowing me to listen to audiobooks. I’ve got my other favorites, like my Bluetooth headphones, as well.” —Kier Huehnergarth, M.D., cardiologist, The Polyclinic



“I almost always have my water bottle with me (and I never fill it with anything besides water).” —Stephen Walston, M.D., internal medicine, The Polyclinic Madison Center