Culture

Friday, 11/15/2013 6:55 PM
Seattle-based photographer Eirik Johnson is captivated by the most modest of dwellings: makeshift hunting shacks, remote forest campsites, animal burrows. In his show Barrow Cabins, he reveals such structures in stark relief, pairing twin shots—one taken in winter, one taken in summer—of slapdash shanties at the northernmost edge of our continent. Built by members of Alaska’s Iñupiat tribe, who use them as hunting cabins (walrus and whales in winter, caribou and seals in summer), the ramshackle plywood abodes sit on black gravel expanses abutting the Arctic Ocean.
Friday, 11/15/2013 5:52 PM
Seattle has topped a variety of lists lately, including (and not surprisingly) Flavorwire’s 20 Great American Cities for Writers That Aren’t New York. That fun factoid combined with this month’s National Novel Writing Month, in which an endless stream of writers challenge themselves to complete a 500,000 word novel by November 30, means Seattle will likely have even more caffeinated wordsmiths typing away in neighborhood coffee houses. 
Thursday, 11/14/2013 9:47 PM
Must SeeTodd Jannausch at Method Gallery(11/15 to 12/21, times vary) — Seattle sculptor Todd Jannausch—known for bringing local artists together for collaborative, renegade public art projects—brings his inspired eye to a solo show, Callus, focused on the tools of his trade.
Tuesday, 11/12/2013 11:09 PM
Seasoned Nutcracker fans know exactly when to watch for it: at the top of the second act. That’s when an “Easter egg” of sorts appears in the background of the set illustrator Maurice Sendak designed specifically for Pacific Northwest Ballet’s production of Nutcracker. All but hidden, the sneaky little Wild Thing gets a glimpse of the action, with Sugar Plum Fairies dancing in its horned head.
Tuesday, 11/12/2013 7:59 PM
Dear Mayor Murray,I hate to-do lists—my mother was always thrusting them in my teenage face—but that doesn’t mean I can’t make myself obnoxious by offering you one now that the election is over. The coming four years are big ones for Seattle, with numerous huge projects coming online and posing challenges. So, here’s my modest list of top priorities.1. Public Safety
Thursday, 11/07/2013 10:11 PM
Must Get TicketsTickets Still on Sale for BREW SeattleSnap up your $40 pass to Seattle magazine’s inaugural BREW Seattle, a beer tasting festival on November 14 with oodles of brews on tap. Your ticket earns you six tasting tokens, each one good for a five-ounce pour (in your own special BREW Seattle mini mug). Must CelebrateRock on with Barsuk Records
Thursday, 11/07/2013 6:03 PM
It’s probably not a ballet dancer’s lifelong dream to be described as buggy, but in the case of Crystal Pite’s piece Emergence, it proves the highest compliment. The Vancouver B.C.–based choreographer—whose own contemporary dance company, Kidd Pivot, performs brilliant, edgy work—had swarm intelligence on the brain when she crafted the piece, originally for the National Ballet of Canada in 2009.
Thursday, 10/31/2013 10:18 PM
Must ListenGroove at the Earshot Jazz Festival(11/1 and 11/2, times vary) — The festival continues its 25th anniversary extravaganza, with an incredible lineup that includes local master musician Bill Frisell.Must CelebrateRaise a Glass at the Two Beers Brewing Anniversary Party
Tuesday, 10/29/2013 10:36 PM
Last week on NBC’s singing contest, The Voice, two local contestants represented the Pacific Northwest well and gave star-quality performances that left us wanting more. Austin Jenckes, a native of Duval, Washington, battled it out against his teammate and nabbed a spot in the knockout rounds.
Monday, 10/28/2013 6:46 PM
Contemporary Seattle music isn’t all about hip-hop and beard rock. The city has a thriving and ever evolving jazz scene, exemplified by local supergroup Industrial Revelation. With Evan Flory-Barnes on upright bass, Ahamefule Oluo on trumpet, Josh Rawlings on keyboard and D’Vonne Lewis on drums, the quartet is rooted in jazz, but branches off into fresh and unexpected directions that range from avant-jazz to indie rock to hard core to post-bop—all in evidence on the new album Oak Head.
Friday, 10/25/2013 8:10 PM
Want to see your charitable event in the pages of Seattle magazine's annual Charitable Events Guide (CEG)? The 2014 guide, our 11th edition, will be published in February 2014. Designed as a calendar for our generous community of donors to plan their charitable giving, the Charitable Events Guide is the ultimate philanthropist’s datebook.
Friday, 10/25/2013 6:13 PM
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DOWNTOWNTrick or Treat on the Waterfront: More than 12 businesses, from the Ferry Terminal to Bell Harbor Conference Center, participate in the fun. Little tricksters can seek out their treats with a provided Treasure Hunt map. Sunday 10/27, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Waterfront Park/Pier 58, 1301 Alaskan Way. Free
Thursday, 10/24/2013 9:12 PM
The country’s largest bike club is based in Seattle, and now the longstanding nonprofit—founded in 1970—has a new executive director. Elizabeth Kiker (yes, it rhymes with “biker”) took the handlebars of Cascade Bicycle Club (CBC) in early September, filling the clipless cycling shoes of Chuck Ayers, who held the position for the past 16 years.
Thursday, 10/24/2013 6:57 PM
Must SeePhotos of Food at the Moment of Being Cooked(10/26 to 2/17/14, times vary) — How exactly does heat make an egg physically transform? Seattle entrepreneur Nathan Myhrvold helped popularize molecular gastronomy (the hyper-nerdy take on cooking) with his book Modernist Cuisine (2011). Now Photography of Modernist Cuisine: The Exhibition at the Pacific Science Center showcases 100 stunning large-format shots from the book. Read on for our interview with Myhrvold.
Wednesday, 10/23/2013 10:04 PM
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As “Psychic Bob” on Seattle’s long-running sketch comedy show Almost Live (which ran 1984–1999), cast member Bob Nelson played an ersatz prognosticator who could make only the most obvious predictions (“In 1998, Hooters will continue to attract a mostly male clientele”). As an announcer in a sketch about the Low-key Baseball Network (“For people who like to watch baseball, but perhaps they don’t care for all that noise”), he became catatonic when describing home runs. “I always played low-key people or dumb guys,” Nelson says.