Culture

Tuesday, 03/17/2015 5:42 PM
Accessbility is a high priority at the Pacific Science Center. A quick glance at the science and technology museum's website and you'll find a swath of helpful services it offers its visitors: complimentary wheelchairs, free admission for aides accompanying guests with disabilities, a friendly welcome to service animals and more.
Tuesday, 03/17/2015 4:34 PM
Twin Peaks drama: Word surfaced recently that the show's writer-director David Lynch was unclear whether Showtime's reboot of the series would happen saying "there are complications." But, according to Entertainment Weekly, Twin Peaks is moving forward despite Lynch's confusing comments. Phew.
Monday, 03/16/2015 5:38 PM
Yesterday was Selection Sunday, when the NCAA selection committee released the 68 men's basketball teams that make up the 2015 tournament. There were surprises; there were snubs (ahem, Temple); and there were obvious choices for top seeds (Kentucky, Duke). Eastern Washington University made the cut. The school is a 13 seed and will take on Georgetown--a four seed--this Thursday.
Monday, 03/16/2015 4:13 PM
Wee Art
As their young sons grew up, friends Ana Brown and Kim Edberg encountered a challenge more seasoned parents know all about: what to do with the prodigious artwork created by their budding Picassos. After a short run on a bulletin board or under a refrigerator magnet, all that creativity usually ends up stowed away.
Friday, 03/13/2015 2:57 PM
SIFF
Tech Wars. The University of Washington is planning to expand its technology program in a big way, The Puget Sound Business Journal said yesterday. The Global Innovation Exchange Program (GIX) is set to launch in 2016, and will be the new cornerstone for graduate students studying technology.
Thursday, 03/12/2015 5:09 PM
prohibition woman
The 1920's marked a period of Prohibition in our country, and Seattle was certainly no exception. Although, where there were temperance lobbyists and suffragists, there were also flappers and bootleggers, and the establishments in which they privately reveled. Like many cities throughout the country, Seattle and the surrounding Puget Sound region became hubs where speakeasies and secret drinking establishments lived, and The Roaring Twenties swung on.
Thursday, 03/12/2015 6:05 AM
Must Listen Two Music Greats Play the Paramount Saturday (3/14, 8 p.m.) With 32 Grammy Awards between them, music legends Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea take the stage together in a show that very well may cause fans to spontaneously combust.
Wednesday, 03/11/2015 4:42 PM
Daylight Savings
Prepare for a bit of time travel this month: Sunday, March 8, was the day we sprang forward one hour in the name of longer, lighter evenings. But it’s not all kayaking after work and eating picnic dinners. Assistant professor Christopher Barnes of the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business has been studying the dark side of daylight savings in terms of behavior changes witnessed on the Monday after the time change—sometimes known as Sleepy Monday, or more ominously, Risky Monday.
Tuesday, 03/10/2015 9:05 PM
St. Patrick's Day
Yinz ready for a good ole' Irish celebration? Pull out the cable-knit sweater, bury the corned beef in a potato-carrot stew, prepare ye Irish soda bread, play that harp and fiddle through the speakers, and gather 'round the Guinness, because St. Patrick's Day is brewing and celebrations are to be had all over the state. Grab your dearest lads and lassies and join the Irish fun nearest you.   Capitol Hill
Tuesday, 03/10/2015 4:40 AM
The Seattle Times puts hard data to the trend all of us are feeling: the diminishment of Seattle’s middle class. The numbers show that half of all new households in King County are poor, and the other half rich—giving truth to the old line about “how the other half lives.” Half of the new households are below the county’s median household income of $35K, half earn roughly double the median at $180K.
Monday, 03/09/2015 7:36 PM
Seattle Dances gala
Movers and Shakers. On Saturday night, sequins and shimmys were rampant on the dance floor during the sixth-annual Plymouth Housing Group's "Seattle Dances" gala at Seattle's Fremont Studios.
Friday, 03/06/2015 4:04 PM
Uniqlo
Latin Cuisine Adds a Gyro Machine. Ever since Columbia City's Grecian Delight went temporarily out of business after an SUV ran into the space last August, locals complained for the loss of Greek fare in their neighborhood.
Thursday, 03/05/2015 9:17 PM
Among the many signs that spring has arrived are the wealth of excellent performances, exhibits and concerts suddenly competing for space in our calendars. Will you get to know a Lizard Boy, indulge in Splurge Land or buckle up with Chastity Belt? We recommend all three—and 42 more arts events—in our guide to the best things to see, hear and experience this season.  1. LOVE IS  COMPLICATED, NO MATTER WHERE…  [ON A SOUTHERN  PLANTATION WITH AN  ALCOHOLIC HUSBAND] Fresh off a stint playing the romantic leading roles in Carousel at The 5th, local stars Brandon O’Neill and Laura Griffith take on another fiery couple: Brick and Maggie in Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize–winning play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. This Southern sizzler is one of several plays ACT is restaging for its 50th anniversary. 4/17–5/17. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676; acttheatre.org [AMID A LAND DISPUTE IN RURAL IRELAND] John Patrick Shanley won several Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for his play Doubt: A Parable, and nabbed an Oscar for his film Moonstruck. With his newest work, Outside Mullingar (nominated for a Tony in 2014), he leaves behind his beloved NYC setting for rural Ireland, where neighboring 40-something farmers turn from feuding to falling in love. 4/24–5/17. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222; seattlerep.org [IN BED WITH YOUR PARTNER AND A STRANGER] In Threesome, by award-winning Seattle writer Yussef El Guindi, two Egyptian Americans decide a threesome will solve their relationship woes. Guindi has proven himself a pro at penning awkward sexual scenes (see Pilgrims Musa and Sheri in the New World), so expect squirmy hilarity (not to mention politics, gender bias and the repercussions of long-held secrets) to ensue in this world-premiere. 6/5–6/28. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676; acttheatre.org 2. THERE’S NO “I”  IN TEAM… [AT A RUNDOWN MOVIE  THEATER] Along with the customary humiliations of a first job come first adult friendships, first time figuring out how to pay rent and first glimmers of what the future might bring. Three millennials experience such firsts together—while cleaning up popcorn at a struggling movie theater in The Flick, a 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner by Annie Baker (Circle Mirror Transformation), staged by New Century Theatre Company in its new home. 3/5–4/4. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223; wearenctc.org [AT A HIGH-END REAL ESTATE OFFICE ON THE SKIDS]  The comedy is dark and the blows are low in Laura Schellhardt’s (The K of D) The Comparables, a world-premiere play in which three women working in real estate go for each other’s throats and after each other’s job security. Billed as a “neo-feminist satire,” the story explores three clashing perspectives on how to get ahead as a businesswoman. 3/6–3/29. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222; seattlerep.org [ON A BASKETBALL COURT IN A TINY DUST BOWL TOWN] Meg Miroshnik’s The Tall Girls chronicles a group of young women seeking escape routes from their struggling Dust Bowl town. The exit signs light up when a stranger shows up and organizes the girls into basketball team. This West Coast premiere from the author of The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, produced by Washington Ensemble Theatre, ups the tension with a basketball game played live on stage. 5/1–5/18. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223; washingtonensemble.org 3. BEST TO BURST INTO SONG WHEN FACED WITH  UNFAMILIAR  SCENARIOS,  INCLUDING… [SUDDEN JOURNEY TO THE UNDERWORLD] In the new pop-rock musical Jasper in Deadland, a teen boy facing garden-variety demons is suddenly plunged into an underworld awash in more tangible monsters. Searching for a lost love, he encounters all manner of creatures (hailing from a global array of cultural mythologies), and in the process learns what it really means to be alive. 4/30—5/24. Times and prices vary. The 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave.; 206.625.1900; 5thavenue.org [INCREDIBLY PERSISTENT FREAK IN A WHITE MASK] Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera still reigns as Broadway’s longest-running musical, and it’s easy to see why, what with the disfigured creeper who lives in a secret lair under the opera house, a heroine who seems to be kind of into her stalker, and, of course, those big, bold songs. 4/30–5/10. Times and prices vary. The Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St.; 206.682.1414; stgpresents.org TheatreThis season’s lineup teaches audiences some valuable lessons [LIZARD BOY]Seattle playwright/composer/cellist Justin Huertas presents his world-premiere musical, Lizard Boy, a coming-of-age/coming-out story that takes inspiration from comic books, iconic love stories and personal history. Expect catchy folk-rock songs, a boy covered in green scales, a precipitous dragon bite, an all-powerful female rocker and newfound superpowers. 3/27–4/26. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222; seattlerep.org  1. Love is Complicated, No Matter Where:On a Southern Plantation With an Alcoholic Husband Seattle actors Brandon O’Neill and Laura Griffith play the steamy lead duo in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, opening 4/17 at ACT; photo by Hayley YoungFresh off a stint playing the romantic leading roles in Carousel at The 5th, local stars Brandon O’Neill and Laura Griffith take on another fiery couple: Brick and Maggie in Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize–winning play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. This Southern sizzler is one of several plays ACT is restaging for its 50th anniversary. 4/17–5/17. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676 Amid a Land Dispute in Rural Ireland John Patrick Shanley won several Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for his play Doubt: A Parable, and nabbed an Oscar for his film Moonstruck. With his newest work, Outside Mullingar (nominated for a Tony in 2014), he leaves behind his beloved NYC setting for rural Ireland, where neighboring 40-something farmers turn from feuding to falling in love. 4/24–5/17. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222 In Bed with Your Partner and a Stranger In Threesome, by award-winning Seattle writer Yussef El Guindi, two Egyptian Americans decide a threesome will solve their relationship woes. Guindi has proven himself a pro at penning awkward sexual scenes (see Pilgrims Musa and Sheri in the New World), so expect squirmy hilarity (not to mention politics, gender bias and the repercussions of long-held secrets) to ensue in this world-premiere. 6/5–6/28. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676 2. There's No "I" In Team: At a Rundown Movie Theatre Along with the customary humiliations of a first job come first adult friendships, first time figuring out how to pay rent and first glimmers of what the future might bring. Three millennials experience such firsts together—while cleaning up popcorn at a struggling movie theater in The Flick, a 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner by Annie Baker (Circle Mirror Transformation), staged by New Century Theatre Company in its new home. 3/5–4/4. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223 At a High-end Real Estate Office On the Skids The comedy is dark and the blows are low in Laura Schellhardt’s (The K of D) The Comparables, a world-premiere play in which three women working in real estate go for each other’s throats and after each other’s job security. Billed as a “neo-feminist satire,” the story explores three clashing perspectives on how to get ahead as a businesswoman. 3/6–3/29. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222 On a Basketball Court in a Tiny Dust Bowl Town Meg Miroshnik’s The Tall Girls chronicles a group of young women seeking escape routes from their struggling Dust Bowl town. The exit signs light up when a stranger shows up and organizes the girls into basketball team. This West Coast premiere from the author of The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, produced by Washington Ensemble Theatre, ups the tension with a basketball game played live on stage. 5/1–5/18. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223 3. Best to Burst Into Song When Faced With Unfamiliar Scenarios, Including... Sudden Journey to the Underworld In the new pop-rock musical Jasper in Deadland, a teen boy facing garden-variety demons is suddenly plunged into an underworld awash in more tangible monsters. Searching for a lost love, he encounters all manner of creatures (hailing from a global array of cultural mythologies), and in the process learns what it really means to be alive. 4/30—5/24. Times and prices vary. The 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave.; 206.625.1900 Incredibly Persistent Freak In a White Mask  Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera still reigns as Broadway’s longest-running musical, and it’s easy to see why, what with the disfigured creeper who lives in a secret lair under the opera house, a heroine who seems to be kind of into her stalker, and, of course, those big, bold songs. 4/30–5/10. Times and prices vary. The Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St.; 206.682.1414
Thursday, 03/05/2015 8:32 PM
Aurora Bridge
As a city that's had plenty of recent transportation quirks--Bertha delays and getting stuck, for one--Seattle public transportation has plans to trudge forward in a big way.
Thursday, 03/05/2015 7:38 PM
Black River and Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley
Black River by S.M. Hulse (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $24)