Issue

April 2015

Best New Restaurants

Drink Up! The 10 Hottest Local Beers, Wine & Spirits

From this Issue

In our April 2015 issue, our food and dining editor Allison Scheff presented her picks for the 10 Best New Restaurants in town. But we always know our readers have a thing or two to say, too. Behold, your selections in our annual Best Restaurants Readers' poll.

Poor us. We spent the year eating delicious things at new restaurants, and there were more than a few. We encountered a wealth of barbecue, green juices and kale, mammoth sandwiches, wood smoke and Middle Eastern spices. And now, more than ever, we found that the buzziest restaurants do double duty as some of the city’s finest cocktail bars.

With Chophouse Row’s debut (opening May 1 on 11th Avenue between Pike and Union streets), Capitol Hill will be home to two destination food halls; the first, of course, being the west end’s marvelous Melrose Market (at Melrose and Pine streets).

Back in 2012, environmental journalist Bruce Barcott was considering voting no on Initiative 502, due to a general distaste for cannabis culture and a vague fear that legalizing marijuana might make it too available to his kids.

In 2009, a Seattle-area property manager, Michael (who asked that we not use his last name), developed a minor case of diverticulitis, a not uncommon digestive disease. His doctor prescribed strong antibiotics, but he didn’t get better. Instead, Michael came down with another gut infection, caused by a type of bacteria called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff.

In 2009, a Seattle-area property manager, Michael (who asked that we not use his last name), developed a minor case of diverticulitis, a not uncommon digestive disease. His doctor prescribed strong antibiotics, but he didn’t get better. Instead, Michael came down with another gut infection, caused by a type of bacteria called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff.

Bamboo gets a bad rap. And Seattle native Stan Andreasen, aka “Stan the Bamboo Man,” understands why.

“It’s a terrible plant—I mean you have to really, really watch it,” he warns.

More is more when it comes to dressing this spring: geometric patterns, animal prints and bold flora. Layer it on and don’t be afraid to match it—or clash it.

Seattle magazine’s trio of beverage experts—cocktail columnist A.J. Rathbun, wine writer Paul Zitarelli and beer guru Kendall Jones—cherry-pick the hottest new locally made spirits, wines and beers, along with perfectly paired bites.

Best New Brews
What’s trending: super-hopped session ales

Where: Goldendale, Washington, in Klickitat County.

WHY: To bask in the vastness of the universe at the Goldendale Observatory (1602 Observatory Drive, Goldendale; 509.773.3141; free admission).

It’s one of Seattle’s most sparkling gems—which many of us forget about unless we’re looking for cool places to take out-of-towners.

Aside from the pink flamingos flanking the walkway, there’s nothing particularly telltale about the exterior of the studio where one of Seattle’s musical masterminds works his mad science. But just over the threshold, visitors are plunged into the inimitable world of Trimpin, the sound artist, composer, instrument inventor and MacArthur genius who goes by his last name only.

You probably see them all over. Bands of tents set down in a wooded area, flashes of blue tarp dangling from a freeway overpass, or clusters of cardboard wrestled into shapes that will provide some kind of shelter. They’re small, ad hoc camps of homeless people, and their numbers are growing.

Known for the creative cocktails and tasty nibbles served at its Phinney Ridge location, Oliver’s Twist has a new outpost in Magnolia (3217 W McGraw St.; 206.946.1651; oliverstwistseattle.com), and the small spot is perfect for cuddly dates.

Seattle choreographer Donald Byrd has been artistic director of Seattle’s Spectrum Dance Theater since 2002. Before that, he was a revered contemporary dance director in New York City, perhaps best known for choreographing The Harlem Nutcracker and the Broadway musical version of The Color Purple (for which he earned a Tony nomination).

The Moose cheers on the Mariners, Rhubarb the Reindeer boosts the Tacoma Rainiers, and the Everett Aquasox find motivation in that weird frog, but Seattle has a few heavy hitters that could use a little blind enthusiasm from a mascot of their own.

Can you feel it? This hopeful season always carries with it a sense of renewal and expansiveness. Throw open your curtains, sweep away the dust bunnies and spruce up your decor with cheerful home accents that celebrate the revival going on outdoors.
 

BALLARD
[Cuban]
Geo’s Cuban and Creole 
 

Explaining that he has had a heart attack and needs medicine for the pain, Dimitrias Manoulidis raises a fat, smoking joint and takes a deep drag. Frankly, he was not what I had in mind when I envisioned what our state’s newest tourists would look like.

A little more than a year ago, in my Gray Matters column “Seven Slogans of Seattle,” I put forward the idea that Seattle needs a new nickname. We’ve been Queen City, Jet City and since the ’80s, rather lamely I think, The Emerald City.

Call me a buzzkill. I get it, I deserve it. Nobody goes to Brave Horse Tavern to eat vegan, not when there are juicy burgers on the menu, plus wood-stove baked soft pretzels with pimento-cheddar dip, wood-fired chicken wings and house-cured ham and cheddar sandwiches with those terrific pretzels serving as a bun.

“Italians, both men and women, are thought to be the most fashionable and impeccable dressers in the world, but what I admire is the work and knowledge behind the beauty, ” says Issaquah-based accessories designer Mun Hui Yi.

A good handbag is one of life’s small blessings. Find one that suits your style, holds all of your essentials and is made well, and you’re set for life. If supporting a local designer is also part of your agenda, Fremont-based Alice Noon (alicenoon.com) is the line for you.

After 17 years spent dressing legions of tiny tykes in clothing so beautiful that adults coveted the same styles in their size, Flora & Henri’s Jane Hedreen is having some grown-up time. In addition to the kids’ clothes that put her on the map, Hedreen has launched Flora Femme, a small but growing women’s line.

Kitchen herb gardens are reasonably common around the city, but rare is the garden that contains lovage—a robust perennial that looks and tastes like celery.

As their young sons grew up, friends Ana Brown and Kim Edberg encountered a challenge more seasoned parents know all about: what to do with the prodigious artwork created by their budding Picassos. After a short run on a bulletin board or under a refrigerator magnet, all that creativity usually ends up stowed away.