Issue

January 2015

Cheap Eats

Breakfast & lunch for under $10!

From this Issue

On January 24, 2014, there were 3,123 people sleeping on the streets and more than 6,000 in shelters or transitional housing in King County.

The idea of Sasquatch has long been alluring, as the missing link that lurks at the edge of Northwest forests and also in our collective unconscious.

Breakfast of Champions

For $10 or less

Morsel and Bean

It’s one of the basic tenets of decorating: Where there are children, nothing shall be white.

Happy New Year, Seattle. It's time to cleanse our souls of stale happenings of 2014.

At his rehearsal studio in Bellevue, wearing pink and red socks emblazoned with “Whim W’him,” choreographer Olivier Wevers is clearly in his element. “Push the arms, but don’t swing them,” he gently directs his dancers, modeling the subtle difference.

You’ll have to traverse an adventurous route amid South Lake Union traffic and construction, parking and valets, and then make a push through Daniel’s Broiler restaurant, the regular Daniel’s bar, and glass doors between glass shelves lined with bottles of fine spirits, to reach Prime 809 (809 Fairview Place N; 206.621.8262; schwartzbros.com

Upon being commissioned to create a new orchestral piece for the Seattle Symphony, composer and clarinetist Angelique Poteat, who turns 29 this month, immediately set to work immersing herself in the oeuvre of her musical inspiration: Pearl Jam.

Clay has a mind of its own—it just needs some help making it up. So says Kristin Nelson of her Vit Ceramics line, organic-inspired porcelain pottery and dishware crafted in subtle, soothing tones of gray and taupe (the line also comes in an array of brighter colors).

Knickknacks, tchotchkes, accessories—whatever you call them, everyone has some, but few really know how to show them off to the best effect. It’s a skill; indeed, it’s one that interior designer and architect Bradley Barnett, founder of architectural, design and branding firm Guild13 (guild13.com), has in spades.

In a small, private Belltown event space, members of Seattle band St. Paul de Vence begin tuning a trumpet and strumming a banjo. As the audience settles in on this winter evening, there’s electricity in the air—a sense that something exciting is afoot, and the people here are lucky witnesses.

It’s a good time to be a diner in Bellevue. If the construction cranes hovering over the city weren’t already a dead giveaway, a lot is happening on the Eastside, and that certainly includes restaurants.

Twenty-four-hour diners certainly have their merits, but in Seattle, late-night eating is where it’s at, and it doesn’t get more enjoyable than with takeout from Kedai Makan. There is something incredibly satisfying about grabbing a midnight order of Malaysian grub at the Capitol Hill walk-up window on East Olive Way (open until 2 a.m.

Built in 1979, the MacRae house on Hood Canal’s Dabob Bay is considered an architectural gem not only for the feat of engineering required to plant the home on uneven and heavily forested terrain, but also for its light-filled interior that offers views, like those from a tree house, of the surrounding Douglas fir forest.

BALLARD
Cioppino at Fresh Fish Co.

Known for her wisteria-colored hair, cat-eye spectacles, regal composure and biting wit, Australian comedy goddess Dame Edna Everage (Barry Humphries) has been entertaining audiences for nearly a half-century. But sadly, the empress of satire is calling it quits; this year, she embarks on Dame Edna’s Glorious Goodbye: The Farewell Tour (1/15–1/18.

It’s a new year—time to engage in the annual tradition of shaking yourself out of a holiday food coma and putting down the pecan pie in favor of an exercise plan. But first you must ask yourself: When it comes to working out, are you a loner or a joiner? Do you prefer to exert yourself in the privacy of your own home or in the company of sweating strangers?

When I think of moonshine, I think of Mayberry sheriff Andy Griffith busting stills and dealing with genial drunk Otis, who picked up his high-octane spirits from backwoods moonshiners. This idea of the illegal still, hidden back in the hills with the law trying to hunt it down, is what many associate with moonshine.

With its signature angular lines and striking shape, the Seattle Public Library’s Central Library not only houses masterpieces, it has inspired one: the “Bellevue” bathtub by California-based Hydro Systems.

WHERE: Salish Lodge and Spa seated at the edge of Snoqualmie Falls (6501 Railroad Ave., Snoqualmie; 425.888.2556; salishlodge.com. $199–$339).

Punxsutawney Phil tends to (ground)hog all the attention, but truth be told, weather-predicting woodchucks are a dime a dozen (see Shubenacadie Sam, Wiarton Willie, General Beauregard Lee). In our rainy climate, we prefer a more amphibian take on meteorology, specifically, a revered bullfrog named Snohomish Slew.

Quick quiz: What’s the most expensive housing market in North America? If you answered Beverly Hills, San Francisco or Manhattan, thank you for playing.

It’s actually Vancouver, British Columbia, a city where the median income is a relatively modest $71,000 and plain Jane single-family houses in good neighborhoods sell for more than $1 million.

From royal coins to Lands’ End totes, monograms have long been deployed to add a special, personalized touch to another otherwise mundane items. It was that desire to add meaning that inspired Bellevue-based artist Maja Arnold to create distinctive monogram necklaces, cast in sterling silver, white or yellow gold, using a bold, modern font.

Two historic enemies recently achieved a remarkable détente. The agreement grabbed headlines, but for many, the topic was inherently a snoozer: an alliance between the ports of Seattle and Tacoma. It might sound yawn-inducing, but it could be a harbinger of a major—and positive—shift in regional dynamics.

January is the quietest month for a Northwest forager. The mushrooms and berries of fall are but a memory, and most spring greens are still months away. This is the time of year to break into the larder.

What’s that, you didn’t put up?

While it’s good to try our local moonshine by itself, and with a few healthy chunks of ice, I think it makes a swell base for cocktails, too.

It’s not just you. Pretty much everyone hates Comcast. The super-scientific method of confirming this—checking Yelp reviews—turns up a cascade of comments like these: “If I could, I would rate Comcast below negative,” and “Literally the worst company I’ve ever had to work with,” and “If there were any other option, I’d take it.”

Somewhere in our attics or basements lurk dusty boxes containing old family photos, newspaper clippings, marriage licenses, death certificates, maybe even an 8-mm movie taken long ago—remnants of the past and orphans of the digital age. It’s a shame to abandon those precious personal effects, but a daunting task to organize them in a meaningful way.