Issue

March 2014

What Does Your Zip Code Say About You?

What Your ZIP Code Says About You, plus Seatle versus the Eastside: A Matter of Perspective

From this Issue

!--paging_filter--pSuperheroes, supervillains, comic-book lovers and sci-fi fans flock to the Washington State Convention Center on March 28-30 for this beloved nerd ball.

!--paging_filter--pMarch may be National Reading Month, but in hyper-literary Seattle that’s the case every month.

!--paging_filter--pThe success of The Old Sage, the latest from chefs and business partners Brian McCracken and Dana Tough (Tavern Law, The Coterie Room, Spur Gastropub), who opened it last June, depends very much on the angle one takes in approaching the place.

!--paging_filter--pAlthough it may be best known for its aerospace and tech industries, Seattle has a thriving food sector, with acclaimed restaurants all around the city and a bevy of chefs and bartenders who have attained celebrity status. It’s a great place to start a career in food or just sock away some cash while preparing for the next move.

!--paging_filter--pIt’s the ultimate dream of the working stiff: to skip the 9-to-5 grind and just work from home. It seems like a magical land somewhere over the rainbow. You choose your own hours. Eliminate office politics. Reduce your morning commute to 20 carpeted paces. Work in your jammies.

!--paging_filter--pspan style="color: #ff6600;"strongSenior Manager, Client Engagement, Zillow/strong/spanbrstrongBrent Downey/strongbrstrongMonths on the job:/strong 4brstrongPrevious job: /strongOnboarding manager at AmazonbrstrongHow did you learn about the job?/strong LinkedIn brstrongWhy do you think you landed the job?

!--paging_filter--pIt may be owned by the folks behind West Seattle’s more upscale (and totally delicious) Neapolitan joint, a href="http://seattlemag.com/article/restaurant-review-pizzeria-22"Pizzeria 22/a, but Quadrato serves a whole other genre of pizza.

!--paging_filter--pShoes with recording devices built into the heels, coins embedded with deadly needles, pens that shoot tear gas, umbrellas that fire poison pellets—ah, for the olden days of spying, before the NSA began monitoring our phone conversations, Google started tracking Internet searches and drones filled the skies.

!--paging_filter--pGiven Seattle’s current love affair with all things artisanal and old-fashioned, the arrival of the Kalakala Co. Animation and Mercantile should perhaps come as no surprise—but it’s a nice one.

!--paging_filter--pChoreographer Zoe Scofield combines her training as a classical ballerina with a grotesque physicality that seems to come from a primal place—a netherworld writhing just beneath our own skin.

!--paging_filter--pTextile designer Lindsey Bender uses a world of natural dyes when hand-painting the whisper-soft, light wool scarves for her line, Coulee.

!--paging_filter--pSome people make a href="http://www.seattlemag.com/article/personalized-pillows-pillowmob"pillows/a out of them, and other people, a href="http://www.seattlemag.com/article/modern-quilts-your-home"quilts/a—but north Queen Anne

!--paging_filter--pRaised in Bellingham, where her family had a “hobby farm” with chickens, cows and pigs, Janelle Maiocco is no stranger to tractors and muddy barn boots. The 41-year-old mother of two has been a trained chef, food blogger and food marketer, and in September she launcheda href="HTTP://WWW.farmstr.com" target="_blank" Farmstr.com/a—a kind of Craigslist for locally farmed food.

When Mount Calvary Christian Center pastor Reggie Witherspoon was growing up in the Central District in the 1960s and ’70s, the neighborhood was tight-knit and largely African-American. But today, it’s another story. “It’s radically different,” he says. Now, he can visit the neighborhood and not see any African-Americans.

!--paging_filter--pIt is a blessing to live in a city so excited about good food that, when an impossibly slim sliver of space is left between businesses in a neighborhood the size of your pocket, you’ll blink and a little restaurant will pop right up.

!--paging_filter--pstrongWHERE:/strong Sol Duc Hot Springs near Port Angeles on the Olympic Peninsula (12076 Sol Duc Hot Springs Road, Port Angeles; a href="http://www.olympicnationalparks.com" target="_blank"olympicnationalparks.com/a).

!--paging_filter--pThe cul-de-sac—icon of suburbia—has fallen out of favor with urban planners seeking greater connections between neighborhoods and transit-friendly throughways. For car-eschewing, density-seeking millennials, they are a punch line.

Nathan Hartman of Kerf Design (Interbay; 206.954.8677) has been making Seattle-area kitchens hip and tidy with his custom plywood cabinetry for years. Now he has a stylish storage option designed for the whole house, the Kerf Wall.

!--paging_filter--pSeveral years ago, after living in Switzerland for 11 years, Mark and Jo repatriated to Seattle, where the couple had hoped to continue the cosmopolitan car-free existence they had adopted in Europe. But when they saw the semisecluded spot nestled along a curving, quiet Magnolia street while house hunting, they began to rethink that plan./p

!--paging_filter--pA job interview for a product designer job at Michaels craft store back in 2011 was the impetus for Nicole Ketchum’s new and clever endeavor, Chandelier by Nicole Ketchum (a href="http://www.chandelierbynk.com" target="_blank"chandelierbynk.com/a).

!--paging_filter--pBallard mom Season Evans grew up around the quilting traditions of the Mennonite and Amish communities of southeastern Pennsylvania, “where quilts could be bought from barns and roadside stands,” she says. She taught herself to quilt while in college in Kutztown, Penn.

March 20 marks the official first day of spring, but the warmer, drier, al fresco entertaining days may not arrive for months. And we’re not fond of playing the waiting game.

!--paging_filter--pspan style="color: #71767a; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 21px; background-color: #f4f5f7;"Take a sneak peek at the March issue of emSeattle /emmagazine, where we discover what your zip may say about you and take a cultural trip around town with our Spring arts preview./span/p

Right off the busy intersection of 85th Street and Greenwood Avenue, lies Teachers Lounge (8505 Greenwood Ave. N; 206.706.2880). Owned and staffed by Perryn and Desiree Wright (he’s formerly of Cicchetti and was the original bar manager at Copper Gate, which is where she bartended and made cocktails), the Lounge is in what used to be the Greenwood Academy of Hair.

!--paging_filter--pHeavy on the tongue, creamy and thick as pudding, the only giveaway that you’re eating yogurt is that inimitable tang, the high note that lingers after each bite.

A ZIP code might be a somewhat useless piece of information in the web-o-sphere age, but in Seattle and its environs—an area swelling with hyperlocal neighborhood pride—those five numbers still speak volumes.

!--paging_filter--pstrongOrigins of style:/strong “I can remember in the early 1980s when I was in sixth or seventh grade asking for a pink sweater and subscriptions to emVogue/em, emInterview/em and emGQ/em for Christmas,” says 41-year-old Nordstrom personal stylist Brent Martin—requests that made him quite an original in small-town Colorado, where he grew up.

!--paging_filter--pIf you’ve chosen a side in the Tabasco versus Sriracha debate, you may need to rethink your position. There’s a new contender in the battle for taste buds—straight outta Ballard. Bonache (pronounced “bone-atch,” a word that founder Marc Olsen’s child invented) aims to add big flavor to food without scorching your palate.

For the past 45 years, young women—mostly First Nations—have disappeared along Highway 16 in British Columbia. Some were found murdered, others were never seen again.

!--paging_filter--pLoulay is a curious spot—although at first it might be hard to understand why. Chef Thierry Rautureau’s third restaurant is an energetic, glitzy, big place, with soaring ceilings, open loft seating and a spectacular chandelier that casts a glittery spell over the dining room.

!--paging_filter--pOur March 2014 issue is all about Seattle neighborhoods and the people and places that make our city so liveable (and loveable).

Pulling up to Sam and Katie Barloons’ woodsy Broadview abode, it’s hard to ignore the presence of “The Brain.” The looming concrete-and-steel cube—built in 2002 by Olson Kundig Architects as a neighboring workspace for the home’s former owner, a filmmaker—is an icon among architecture and design devotees.

For bookshelves, fireplace mantels or any other sturdy surface where row after row of books might stand, opt for two hefty, sparkly and very on-trend hunks of rock to keep them all stylishly in line.

!--paging_filter--pBefore its recent remodel, the main entry point from the detached garage of this North Capitol Hill colonial was the kitchen. Common enough in most homes, but less than ideal for a geared-up, storage-poor family with a 1-year-old, and a dilemma that interior designer Brian Paquette sought to remedy.

!--paging_filter--pstrongSeattle Jewish Film Festival /strongCelebrating Jewish and Israeli history, culture, humor and pathos. 3/1–3/9.

!--paging_filter--pstrongDavid Guterson/strongbr[Fiction] Local writer David Guterson made waves last year when his commencement speech at Roosevelt High School failed to paint a sunny view of the future, and instead suggested our lives pass in a “profoundly confused way…and then they end.” See if he’s still spreading tough love when he reads from new work written on the theme “Family Ties.” 3/

!--paging_filter--pstrongimg src="/sites/default/files/newfiles/0314_theater_suit.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 10px;" height="525" width="350"[The Suit]/strongbrIn 1940s–’50s South Africa, a wife is caught in flagrante delicto with another man, who upon being discovered, rushes out and leaves his suit behind.

!--paging_filter--pLike the very best rock ’n’ rollers, Seattle musician Ayron Jones seems just slightly unhinged when he performs live—as if at any moment the music might carry him to a place even he didn’t know he was heading.

!--paging_filter--pSiddhartha’s quest for enlightenment is the inspiration for Songs of the Wanderers, a masterwork by Taiwanese choreographer Lin Hwai-min. Performed by his own Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan, this blend of contemporary and traditional dance features a stunning set covered in 3 and a half tons of golden rice. 3/6–3/8. Times and prices vary. Meany Hall, U.W.

!--paging_filter--pstrong[Painting]/strongbrBorn in Astoria, Oregon, and based in northern California, painter Eric Zener is a master of the photorealist style, creating stunningly vibrant images, often of people underwater (pictured above) or in other personal sanctuaries. 5/1–5/30. Times vary. Free. Foster White Gallery, 220 Third Ave.

!--paging_filter--pDing-dong, spring calling! Time to crawl out of hibernation, take a deep breath and plunge into Seattle’s performance, literary and visual arts.

!--paging_filter--pIn this era of email, ZIP codes may seem passé, gone the way of scented stationery, a postal relic destined for irrelevance (Amazon Sunday delivery notwithstanding). But in neighborhood-loving Seattle, a survey of ZIP codes tells an illuminating story of togetherness.

!--paging_filter--pOwners of Wallingford’s longstanding “poem emporium,” Open Books (openpoetrybooks.com), romantic and business partners J.W. Marshall and Christine Deavel are also acclaimed poets.

!--paging_filter--pWhen I tell people I live in Madison Park, I frequently have the urge to qualify it by saying something like, “I’m doing my best to bring down the demographics.” brbrThere’s no doubt about it, I live in a part of town that is white, rich and a shade more conservative than Seattle political norms. brbrThis is a neighborhood where George W.

!--paging_filter--pLast October, the morning rituals of stay-at-home parents, telecommuters, taxi drivers, students and everyone who regularly relied on KUOW-FM 94.9 to anchor the day were disrupted. The extended caller-driven confabs on gardening and home maintenance were gone.

!--paging_filter--pWhen someone says “single malt” in conversation at the bar, the vast majority of people tend to think of single malt Scotch whiskey made on a romantic craggy landscape in Scotland.

!--paging_filter--pMarch is the time to plan a pilgrimage in honor of Northwest royalty. Spring-run chinook salmon—known as spring kings, or springers—are pushing up the lower Columbia River right now, headed for spawning grounds and hatcheries upstream.