Issue

October 2014

Wine Country Getaways

Rustic & Romantic Spots to Savor
Plus: Stops for Beer Lovers Too!

From this Issue

If you’ve been following the career of David Bazan (center of main photo above) you know he moved from lead singer and songwriter for indie-darling band Pedro the Lion to existential crisis to creating acclaimed solo work.

Eastern Washington is loaded with natural beauty: Rolling fields of onions, wheat and hops, and lush terraced vineyards cut into high desert plateaus, all carved by the majestic Columbia River—what could be better? Consider taking in that view from the veranda of a winery tasting room with a smooth Cabernet or a crisp Gewürztraminer in hand.

The forklift speeds a huge plastic tote to the crusher, twirls it like a toy and dumps the finest Merlot grapes into the gleaming stainless steel maw of the crushing machine. The whirring gears separate the stems, squish the grapes and send them bouncing down the sorting table.

DAY 5: THE BEATING HEART OF WASHINGTON WINE

Staying at the Inn At Abeja is the only way to score an appointment at this stalwart Walla Walla producer (unless you’re on the mailing list). It’s best known for its Cabernets, but the Syrah and Viognier—both made from estate vines right on the winery property—are outstanding as well.

It has been more than a year, but Allen Schauffler’s ninth-floor office overlooking South Lake Union still looks like he just moved in. There is almost nothing hanging from the stark white walls—nary a dent or ding, either. Taped on the glass window at the entrance is a white sheet of copier paper that states simply, “al jazeera america—seattle bureau.”

DAY 4: CLASSICISM, MODERNITY AND ITALIAN MONEY

DAY 2: APPLES, BASALT AND MINI STORAGE

DAY 1: FOLLOWING THE MISSOULA FLOODS

Somewhere deep within an anonymous Lynnwood office park is Wardrobe Ltd., an appointment-only fashion lover’s paradise, with more than 3,000 pieces of the most highly coveted consigned couture and premier designer clothing, handbags and shoes. Owned, operated and obsessively curated by 22-year-old sartorial wunderkind Austin Deppa—who started the company when he was 16—Wardrobe Ltd.

During a stint living in Japan, writer and translator Zack Davisson rented an apartment that was haunted by a ghost. There were bumps in the night, a door the landlord said must never be opened and mysterious red handprints on the ceiling.

Last Christmas, as our family was gathered to open presents, my fiancé reached under the couch cushion he was sitting on and pulled out a handgun.

It wasn’t loaded. And he had only good intentions. The gun was a gift from his stepdad and two older brothers—cleverly hidden under his own seat for him to discover.

But I, suddenly, couldn’t breathe.   

On the fall ballot, Washington residents will be asked to vote on two opposing gun control initiatives—one calling for expanded background checks, the other keeping the current system of background checks in place. These are two of only three statewide gun control measures on November ballots anywhere in the country.

Il Terrazzo Carmine, the iconic, classic Italian restaurant in Pioneer Square, turns 30 in October. With new restaurants popping up all around it, the old man has shown the new guard what’s up by spawning a cicchetti bar.

Intricate inlaid furniture and home accents are lovely complements to a bevy of decor styles, from global chic to modern and sleek. Whether the material is actual bone (by-products of the food industry), mother of pearl or resin placed in a small accessory or a statement-making dresser, you can’t go wrong with an accent piece made using the centuries-old technique of surface inlay.

In the face of shrinking land resources and concerns about carbon footprints, what do we do with our loved ones when they die? For Katrina Spade, 37, a Capitol Hill–based designer with a master’s degree in architecture, that question arose after she had two kids and began thinking about her own mortality.

The name Bruce Lee instantly conjures images of the shirtless martial artist performing speed-of-light kicks, unstoppable blows and nunchaku tricks. But instead, picture the young Lee attending classes at Seattle Central College (then called Edison Technical School) in pursuit of his high school diploma. Imagine him working nights as a waiter at Ruby Chow’s Restaurant on First Hill.

When Landmark Theatres closed the Egyptian Theatre in June 2013, many locals proclaimed it a death knell for authentic Capitol Hill.

It’s nearly 11 a.m., and Bacon & Eggs hums. The air is scented with maple syrup from Vermont, sausage from Walla Walla’s Blue Valley Meats and Stumptown coffee. And though it’s still morning, a Tequila sunrise crafted with freshly squeezed juice makes its way to a table.

When the Seattle Storefronts program took its first steps in 2010, the city was still climbing back from the economic downturn. Papered windows and empty storefronts with dusty For Lease signs were a common sight in retail areas.

Known for witty performance art—as a roving retro secretary/improv poet in The Typing Explosion and a fake scientist/real poet in The Vis-à-Vis Society—Rachel Kessler is currently at work on a funny memoir, Christian Charm Workbook, about her religious upbringing and its impact on her understanding of womanhood.

Born out of a desire to provide a casual respite for Eastlakers, Babirusa (2236 Eastlake Ave. E; 206.329.2744; blindpigbistro.com/babirusa) is one of the newer restaurant/bar hybrids to hit Seattle.

The Filson flagship store sits near Safeco Field, at the base of an off-ramp from the tangle of elevated roadways that lead to the freeways. Most people drive past the unassuming building on Fourth Avenue South with nary a glance, let alone a clue as to the retail wonderland that lives inside—or the legacy of outdoor gear that has been manufactured in Seattle since 1897.

WHERE: The lederhosen capital of the Pacific Northwest: Leavenworth, Washington. WHY: For the 16th annual Leavenworth Oktoberfest (10/3–10/4, 10–11 and 17–18. $10–$20).

The rattle and whistle of trains have long provided a soundtrack for beachgoers at Golden Gardens, salmon spotters at the Ballard locks and sports fans headed to a game in SoDo. So it’s not surprising that so few bother to watch the trains anymore.

For 25 years, I’ve been waiting for the future. And it’s almost here. At least, the next step in a long chain of events leading to the year 2389 has arrived.

Celery Root Puree

1 large bulb celery root (or 2 small)

Cream, to cover

Salt and cayenne pepper, to taste

Walnut vinegar, to taste

Makes 4 to 6 servings

A fortuitous souvenir brought back from France by her sister led Ba Culbert, chef and co-owner of Tilikum Place Café, to one of her dearest ingredients—walnut vinegar. While not a fan of other flavored vinegars, Culbert immediately loved how walnut vinegar has a “subtle and nuanced flavor that keeps dishes light.”

Ballard

Populuxe Brewing

After 20 years of designing for high-end retailers, including Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus, Bellevue-based Jean Glover has ventured out on her own with 8telier, a clothing line she designs for “cosmopolitan women who have an affinity for modern aesthetics.” Translation: easy, comfortable clothing—slightly edgy, but definitely wearable—that transcends trends and feels fresh and familiar a

From Pegasus to pirate, wicked witch to prismatic parrot, lightly loved costumes from local children’s consignment shops deliver fright night fun—and at pretty wicked prices, too.