Issue

September 2014

Best Bets for Fall

Your invitation to the newest, brightest, boldest and best of the season. Plus the Best Korean restaurants.

From this Issue

Seattle’s oldest neighborhood has seen boom times and busts over its 162-year history. It’s experienced prospectors and panhandlers, full occupancy and devastating vacancies. It is home to an arts crowd and a homeless community that coexist in a tenuous relationship.

WOMEN'S CLOTHING
[Designer]
Suk Chai
[Label]
Schai

Read all of our picks for fall arts, including music, theater, film and more here.

Amy O’Neal

[CONTEMPORARY] 10/23–10/26

Coming-of-age choreography, sci-fi ceramics, film noir, new memoirs, kinky boots and the great society—pick your poison in one of the categories below for this season's most impressive arts events, plus the new arts venues that are popping up all over town.

Read all of our picks for fall arts, including music, theater, film and more here.

If you’ve been to the seafood joint Westward, at the foot of Wallingford on the north shore of Lake Union, you’ve likely noticed an oversize ship anchored to the wall behind its bar. But look more closely: Side-view cutaways in the vessel’s wooden hull reveal painstakingly crafted and layered dioramas (and a few are stocked with liquor bottles).

They clasp hands, link arms or sometimes lay heads on each other’s shoulders. In a few cases, someone kisses another on the cheek. At first glance, New York photographer Richard Renaldi’s street portraits seem to be of oddly paired friends—people you wouldn’t expect to see hanging out together, who paused on the sidewalk for a spontaneous snapshot.

Just because you’ve had the good fortune to realize that real estate mantra “location, location, location,” it still doesn’t mean there isn’t room for improvement. Such was the case for a 1924 Tudor-style manse in Woodway (an exclusive enclave south of Edmonds harboring a coterie of grand old estates).

There’s a rather famous item on the lunch menu at Matt's In The Market (MITM), and it’s not the fried catfish sandwich. The Cobb Salad ($15) has been an afternoon delight at this Pike Place Market perch since 2010. What makes it so special are equal parts flavor and flair.

The biggest problem with Corretto (416 Broadway E; 206.328.7817; correttoseattle.com) is that it’s too easy to miss. It’s smack dab in the middle of Broadway, where loads of pedestrians walk by every single day without giving so much as a passing glance to anything new on their way to wherever.

The neighborhood is back for round two, with so many promising new restaurants this fall, it’s head-spinning. Interestingly enough, this time around, most of the new restaurants will be moving into old auto-row-era buildings. We are, after all, a city fond of repurposing.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

Known best for his stint as a writer/performer on the comedy show Almost Live, Joe Guppy was once a patient in the psych ward at Providence Hospital. His new memoir, My Fluorescent God, revisits that experience from the perspective of his current occupation—as a psychotherapist. Hear him read and reflect at the book launch (9/13, 7 p.m.

Who better than a Seattleite to come up with a high-tech coffee lid? Doug Fleming, a native son and avid follower of “third wave” coffee trends, thought it was a shame to ruin high-quality coffee by sipping it through a poorly designed lid. He founded a company called Vaporpath in 2007 and devoted years to developing a better sipping experience.

Foodie contributor Julia Wayne eats her way through some of Seattle's best Korean restaurants. Below, you'll find our picks, divvied up neighborhood by neighborhood, plus a glossary of Korean terms to help you along your delicious way.

Where: Skwachàys Lodge in Vancouver, B.C. Why: This new boutique hotel (rooms start at $225, 31 W Pender St.; 604.687.3589; skwachays.com) near the historic Chinatown neighborhood is awash in art and culture from the First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

Since that glorious February day when the Seahawks smiled, waved and wended their way through countless fans gathered for the Super Bowl parade, our champs have continued to make headlines: Russell Wilson got a divorce, Richard Sherman got into a fight at training camp and Marshawn Lynch got naked in the “body issue” of ESPN The Magazine.

Adapting old buildings for bustling new uses on Capitol Hill is beginning to be a habit for Jim Graham, AIA, of Seattle’s Graham Baba Architects.

To say that Keri Petersen has a knack for stylish bargain hunting as part of her design process would be a gross understatement. Point to nearly any furnishing in the interior designer’s new home and you’re in for sticker shock of the positive kind. Glam champagne-hued entry pendant? $69 from Home Depot. Retro-chic cane armchair?

People with a penchant for thrift shopping may love wandering through the city’s reuse warehouses, stacked to the rafters with old doors, windows, sinks, hinges and knobs, but they might not be sure how to artfully incorporate these elements into their home. Salvation literally can be found at Second Use (SoDo, 3223 Sixth Ave.

It might look like just another tony gallery space in Pioneer Square’s Occidental Park, but behind the doors of Christian Grevstad (312 Occidental Ave. S; 206.938.4360; christiangrevstad.com) lurks an all-encompassing home furnishings design enterprise.

The Kerflight Ripley pendant ($335), an artful mix of shadows and light slivers, comes courtesy of SoDo conceptual design studio Graypants. The hanging fixture has a curved, almost triangular shade that’s been constructed from three sheets of recyclable corrugated cardboard made flexible with a series of cuts called “kerfing” (hence the name).

After an exhausting day spent swiping the Amex at the nearby Bellevue Collection, stop by the new Recoop Spa (925 Bellevue Way NE; 425.429.3323; recoopspa.com) for a heaping helping of R&R in the comfort of delightfully detailed environs.

Like a lot of restaurants that have been around for more than a few years, it’s been a while since anyone has thought twice about The Saint (1416 E Olive Way; 206.323.9922; thesaintsocialclub.com). When it opened in April 2008, it was this cool, superhip and pretty tequila bar on Capitol Hill that specialized in Mexican food.

For years, the only physical evidence of the Tateuchi Center in Bellevue has been in a dim corner of the downtown Hyatt Regency hotel lobby. There, in a preview center, sits a glass-encased balsa wood model of a 2,000-seat concert hall; mounted television screens cycle through photos of imagined future acts and a row of theater chairs summon the ambiance of opening night.

If you’ve noticed a series of mysterious poles popping up in the Central and Chinatown–International districts, you may have wondered—are they not-so-subtle NSA spying devices? Beacons for drones? Signs of an alien invasion?

Putting the needle to the record in the busy corridor at the eastern edge of Capitol Hill, between Montana bar and tiny takeout spot Kedai Makan,

To insist on a $40,000 salary in Seattle is to take a vow of poverty.

That’s what City Council member Kshama Sawant has done. She has said that she’ll take home about that much of her $117,000 salary and devote the balance of it—some $70,000 per year—to her pet causes, in effect tithing most of her taxpayer-funded income.

This beach-and-vampire classic goes back to 1922 and the Rudolph Valentino movie of the same name. Actually, with the below recipe, which subs in the delicious Cherry Bounce from the Old Ballard Liquor Co., call in the Ballard and Sand. You can still serve it up when watching monster movies, but it also goes well at brunch.

Ice cubes

3/4 ounce Scotch

This is a traditional dish made by matsutake hunters while in the woods. A cast iron pot is perfect for cooking it, whether indoors or out.

In the early 1990s, the Central Cascades of Oregon saw a feverish moment of fortune-seeking, reminiscent of the Klondike a century earlier.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

My Goodness

Gateway Band: Soundgarden

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

The recent boom in Washington distilleries has resulted in producers of all sizes, from large spirit and liqueur makers (hello, Woodinville Whiskey!) to mom-and-pop spots (see: the fine folks at Sidetrack) to one of the smallest in total space: the Old Ballard Liquor Co. (4421 Shilshole Ave.

Over the past 10 years, Brazilian native Tininha Silva has owned Tininha’s, a stylish bikini boutique in Fremont; the online Orla Kiely boutique; and her own line of teeny-weeny bikinis (Teu Swimwear)