Top Doctors 2017: Interventional Cardiology

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Cardiology Specialties

Physicians specializing in cardiology use a wide variety of surgical and nonsurgical techniques to treat diseases and disorders of the heart, which range from congenital defects—whether of interior walls of the heart, heart valves, or arteries and veins that carry blood to the heart—to arrhythmias and acquired heart diseases such as coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure.

Interventional Cardiology
These cardiologists use nonsurgical interventional procedures, such as catheters, for procedures that once required open-heart surgery.

Ralph G. Althouse, M.D., percutaneous coronary intervention, acute coronary syndromes, pacemakers, heart attack; Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute, 7320 216th St. SW, Suite 210, Edmonds, 425.744.1777; Swedish Medical Center–Edmonds campus, Swedish Medical Center–Cherry Hill campus; Oxford University Medical School, England, 1982  

11 Years: Joseph Doucette, M.D.,* advanced coronary interventional techniques, general clinical cardiology, echocardiography and stress testing; Overlake Medical Clinic, Cardiology, 1135 116th Ave. NE, Suite 600, Bellevue, 425.454.2656; Overlake Hospital Medical Center; Harvard Medical School, 1984
    
Edward Kim, M.D., EvergreenHealth Heart and Vascular Care, 12333 NE 130th Lane, Suite 320, Kirkland, 425.899.0555; EvergreenHealth, Virginia Mason Medical Center; University of Pennsylvania, 1993
    
Mahesh S. Mulumudi, M.D., complex coronary interventions, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, percutaneous closure of atrial & septal defects, carotid stenting, managing peripheral arterial disease; The Everett Clinic, 3901 Hoyt Ave., Everett, 425.339.5411; Providence Regional Medical Center Everett; Kurnool Medical College, India, 1990
    
Gary L. Weeks, M.D., preventive cardiology, peripheral vascular disease, coronary angiography; Summit Cardiology, 1536 N 115th St., Suite 200, Seattle, 206.363.1004; Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, University of Washington Medical Center; Northwestern University, 1980   

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