Updated! Seattle Magazine's Earth Day Run 2014: Food Trucks & Beer!

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Updated information: You know that the fantastic West Seattle Brewing Company is serving up pints after the race, and now we hear that Chopstix and Curb Jumper Street Eats will be on hand, too, for that necessary post-race sustenance.

Still have yet to register for Seattle mag's Earth Day Run along Alki Beach? Key in Gilt City Seattle to purchase a registration for $27 (that's a whopping 40 percent off the regular reg. price). 

 

Runners and walkers: Our Earth Day Run is back for 2014, and this time it will wind along the Alki Beach waterfront in West Seattle. (This West Seattleite is thrilled!) We debuted our dog-friendly 5K event last year to help raise awareness for environmentally sustainable practices, local businesses and products. (You may remember our fearless style editor Ali Brownrigg's month-long quest to train for the big day.) And this year, a portion of the proceeds from the race will benefit EarthCorps, a Seattle-based nonprofit organization that aims to build a community of leaders through local environmental service.

As for post-race libations, the West Seattle Brewing Company will be pouring pints in the beer garden (every single beer sold benefits the Seattle environmental nonprofit EarthCorps), and anyone--spectators included--are welcome to join in the imbibing. But bring cash; your plastic is no good here. If you're hungry, bites from Ocean Naturals and Sahale Snacks will be on hand. Registration includes your race t-shirt!

The deets: Our Earth Day Run 2014 takes place on April 19, at 9:30 a.m. (check in opens at 8 a.m.), and will start and finish at Alki Beach Park. After you've raced your heart out, expect plenty of post-race festivities and fun swag. As for the results, each runner gets a timing chip on his or her bib and your results will be released within 24 hours of the event. Register Here: http://seattlemag.com/article/earth-day-run-2014

  See you at the finish line! 

Bruce Pavitt's New App, 8Stem, Makes You the DJ

Bruce Pavitt's New App, 8Stem, Makes You the DJ

Sub Pop's Bruce Pavitt has a new app that puts anyone in the producer's seat
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 
8Stem creative director Bruce Pavitt (foreground) and CEO Adam Farish in their Capitol Hill office: Sub Pop’s 25 million record sales were just a start

Sub Pop cofounder Bruce Pavitt knows times have changed since he launched Seattle’s billion-dollar music revolution in the ’80s. Today’s kids prefer gizmos to guitars, and technology gives them easy ways to do it all, from making music to producing it. Pavitt’s new company, 8Stem, offers music fans a free, easy-as-Instagram iPhone app by that name. It turns everyone into a producer, able to delete and add new tracks on existing recordings: lead, bass, drums, instruments, synthesized vocals, beats. Kids addicted to gaming and tech can now listen interactively, erasing part of a tune by Soundgarden’s Kim Thayil—one of 40 artists who license music to 8Stem—and recording their own sounds over Thayil’s, and then sharing it with the touch of a button, so others can remix it at will. “We live in a remix culture,” says Pavitt. “If you go to YouTube, type in any pop song, then add ‘remix,’ the remixes are going to exceed the listeners of the original song.” Pavitt and his tech-exec partner Adam Farish designed 8Stem to cash in on that trend. 

Artists whose music is part of the remix benefit financially thanks to Dubset, a new “fingerprint” technology that scans remixes and detects music owned by any of the 14,000 labels and publishers it has deals with, then makes sure the various owners of the rights are paid. “We just inked a deal with Dubset,” says Pavitt, “and our first track was on Spotify, ‘Sleep In’ by Telekinesis.” 8Stem user Anomie Belle, a noted Seattle musician, added her vocals to the song and put the new version on Spotify; Telekinesis, 8Stem and remixer Belle all get a slice of the profit—and you can, too.

About 30 of 8Stem’s 40 artists are from Seattle, though a few are from London, Argentina and New York City. “We’re trying to reignite the local culture so it’s an energy source for new music and fresh ideas that can go anywhere,” says Pavitt, who used that very technique to conquer the world at Sub Pop. 


Need to Know

1. As a student at The Evergreen State College, Pavitt used $50 and a crayon to create Sub Pop as a fanzine for credit in 1979, made it a record company, and then sold 49 percent of it to Warner Music Group for $20 million in 1995. 

2. Pavitt’s spirited teen pals in his hometown of Park Forest, Illinois, included Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto, who followed him to Seattle and started Soundgarden, and Tom Zutaut, who discovered Enya, Motley Crue and Guns N’ Roses, featuring Seattle’s Duff McKagan.

3. Pavitt predicts that streaming music, including songs remixed on his new 8Stem app, will jump from a $4 billion market today to $16 billion in 2020.  

4. Farish (above, right) cofounded SmartAmerica Home Automation, owns Orcas Island’s Outlook Inn, made two albums and toured America as an electronic dance music DJ.