UW to Offer Digital Publishing Continuing-Ed Program

| Posted
 
 

If you're interested in blogging professionally, self-publishing digitally, creating e-booksor your employer wishes you knew more about such things, look into the University of Washington's new certificate program in digital publishing. The nine-month-long course launches this fall, and it promises a good mix of hands-on training and theoretical insight about many of the legal, aesthetic and revenue challenges tied up in digital publishing. In fact, it aims to cover a somewhat overwhelming range of topics and skills, but no doubt it will become more refined with practice and insight from instructors. And I imagine it would be exciting for students to get in on the ground floor as it's all shaking out, so I highly recommend it.

Instructors haven't been selected for the courses yet, but I happen to know that the advisory board (which designed the curriculum objectives) is made up of local digital content strategists and publishers you want to know: Mark Briggs, Geraldine DeRuiter, Michelle Nicolosi, Chris Pirillo, Katherine Sears and several others (including yours truly, who mostly "advised" by taking notes while those other people spoke...you're welcome).

Applications aren't being accepted just yet. But stay tuned to the page linked above for more details.

Related Content

Potholes are the one thing everyone agrees on. Drivers hate them. Cyclists hate them. Truckers hate them. Bus drivers hate them. Pedestrians hate them. Bumping, jolting, tripping, falling: our shared loathing is a rare point of civic unity

Today’s political climate means uncertainty for certain immigrants. But for many, America is still the country where dreams can be fulfilled and some local immigrant families are finding the pathway to achieve the dream is lined with rows of cannabis

Imagine traveling from Seattle to Portland in half the time it takes to get from downtown Seattle to Bellevue in rush-hour traffic. A University of Washington team of 35 engineering students is working to make this a reality with Hyperloop, a transit system that could zip Seattleites to Stumptown at up to 760 mph

Despite a new administration in the “other” Washington that is pursuing trade and immigration policies antithetical to ones that have helped make this free-trade, diverse and immigrant-friendly city a success, Seattle remains optimistic about the future