What to See This Fall: Film

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That Filmy Feeling
’Tis the season when we’re starting to feel less guilty about heading out of the sun and into darkened movie theaters. Test the waters with the local premiere of Lynn Shelton’s new movie, Laggies, set in Seattle and starring Keira Knightley and Sam Rockwell, which SIFF will screen one night only (9/18; siff.net) at the Egyptian Theatre (soon to be reopened for good!). Meanwhile, Northwest Film Forum plays host with most, featuring the 17th annual Local Sightings Film Festival (9/25–10/4; localsightings.org), where the city’s up-and-coming filmmakers show new shorts, features and documentaries; the new series Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema (10/5–10/9; nwfilmforum.org); and The Seattle Lesbian and Gay Film Festival (10/9–10/19; threedollarbillcinema.org). Dive into the dark with Live by Night, Seattle Art Museum’s film noir series (9/25–12/18; seattleartmuseum.org), this year featuring Out of the Past (10/2), widely regarded as one of the best noir films of all time, starring Robert Mitchum, Kirk Douglas and a character named Leonard Eels. For those who prefer a side of live drama with their canned film, hit On the Boards for the one-night-only performance by celebrated German/British art collective Gob Squad, which will film Super Night Shot on the streets of Seattle, interacting with passersby, one hour before show time. Once back in the auditorium, the film editing—and excitement—takes place before your very eyes (9/6; ontheboards.org). Also in the live/film combo realm, Northwest Film Forum partners with Seattle Asian Art Museum for a screening of Hiroshi Shimizu’s stunning 1933 silent film Japanese Girls at the Harbor (10/4; nwfilmforum.org), with a live score performed by local AONO Jikken Ensemble, known for composing with found objects, toys and kelp instruments. Finally, prepare to address the question Do You Know Bruce?, an expansive new exhibit at the Wing Luke museum chronicling the life and times—including formative years in Seattle—of the martial arts master (opens 10/4; wingluke.org).

Read all of our picks for fall arts, including music, theater and more here.


 

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