The Nordic Museum's Grand Opening is Coming Soon

After a decade’s worth of planning, one of the city’s most beloved cultural institutions has a new HQ
| Updated: November 27, 2018
 
 
The view of the exterior looking eastward

This article appears in print in the March 2018 issue, as part of the Spring Arts PreviewClick here to subscribe.

It's been nearly ten years since the leaders of Seattle’s Nordic Heritage Museum, long housed in a brick schoolhouse on loan from Seattle Schools, began the effort to locate, finance and construct a permanent home for the city’s—and nation’s—only museum that celebrates all the Nordic cultures (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden).

Prepare to be dazzled—albeit in understated Scandinavian style—when the brand-new 57,000-square-foot, Mithun-designed facility, rebranded simply as The Nordic Museum, officially opens the doors to its new home, about a mile south of its former location, in May.

A showpiece for forward-thinking Nordic design (according to Architectural Digest and the New York Times, it’s one of the most anticipated international museums opening this year), the ground-level corridor resembles a fjord; overhead, second-story walkways act as bridges, stitching together a core collection of permanent, historical exhibits, with temporary installations that explore contemporary Nordic culture.

The Nordic regard for purposeful, multiuse spaces is on view everywhere, from new classrooms, a craft studio and a state-of-the-art auditorium to the practical, quiet and efficient Kone elevators, made by a Finnish company. Grand opening 5/5–5/6.

Grand opening times and prices unannounced at press time. Regular museum hours and prices vary. Nordic Museum, Ballard, 2655 NW Market St., 206.789.5707; nordicmuseum.org

 

Related Content

Author Molly Wizenberg in her home with dog

Long a trusted voice on matters of the kitchen, Wizenberg's 'The Fixed Stars' deals with matters of the heart

Colorful bad artwork on display

Upstairs at Café Racer, feast your eyes on the Official Bad Art Museum of Art

Lily Verlaine as the Caterpillar in 'The Burlesque Alice In Wonderland'

Are we pivoting away from placeholder programming and reimagining what live performance can be?

As artists find new ways to connect, things are getting weird and wonderful