4 Eco-Friendly Furniture Pieces You Can Find in Seattle

Embrace your Pacific Northwest nature by incorporating sustainable, environmentally friendly pieces into your space
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

This article appears in print in the April 2018 issue, as part of the "Favorite Home Shops" feature story. Click here to subscribe.

Tirto’s Capitol Hill store (Capitol Hill, 1908 E Mercer St.; 206.322.0597) carries rustically elegant furniture—like this solid wood teak root coffee table (above; pricing varies by size, $1,100 for 39 inches square by 16 inches high)—handmade in the Tirtoprodjo family’s Indonesian workshop.

 

Photographs by Ecobalanza (chair, robinson); Plank&Grain (shelves)

EcoBalanza (SoDo, 624 S Lander St.; 888.220.6020) specializes in luxury upholstered furniture made with organic, natural (and most importantly, nontoxic) materials. The regal, tufted Cleo chair (above, left; $5,100 for the first-tier fabrics; $7,575 for vegetable-tanned leather) is the brand’s most elaborately crafted piece, taking some 40 hours of hand labor.

These are no factory-made distressed wood shelves—Plank&Grain (Chinatown–International District, 666 S King St.; 206.659.9884) uses only reclaimed local lumber, mostly old-growth Douglas fir, to make its custom industrial chic pieces. These boxy shelves (above, right) can be made in any size, from wall-mounted units for the whole wall to freestanding bookshelves ($1,000–$1,500).

Photograph by Couch

Eco-friendly sofa supplier Couch makes custom pieces, many of which you can peruse in the showroom (Ballard, 5304 Ballard Ave. NW; 206.633.6108). And by custom, we mean more than just upholstery—you can choose every detail from size to firmness. The Oliver couch ($2,400–$4,500), introduced last August, is available in hundreds of fabric choices and leather (for about twice the cost).

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