The Art of Driving in the Seattle Rain

As the soggy season returns, a few tips on how to safely navigate the city’s roadways
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 
  • Driving in the Seattle rain
SPLISH SPLASH: With a yearly average of 152 days of rain, it’s important to know the rules of the road when things get wet

This article appears in print in the November 2018 issue. Click here to subscribe.

Even on the best of days, driving in Seattle can be miserable. Throw in some precipitation, and conditions get downright scary. We tapped the Seattle magazine brain trust for a few tips to keep in mind for your next rainy road trip. 

1. Be aware of wear and tear. A year’s worth of driving is enough to warrant a precautionary check at the start of the season. Replace worn tires with poor traction and make this the year you finally replace those old windshield wipers.

2. Drive wired, not tired. Be well rested or just properly caffeinated—an easy fix with a stop at a drive-through espresso stand (why do you think it was invented?).

3. Slow it down and hang it up. Once you find yourself on slick Seattle roads, drive slower than normal. It will give you more time to react, and with our traffic, you’re not getting to your destination anytime soon anyway. (It goes without saying that your phone should be in driving mode and out of your hands.)

4. Pump it up. If you feel your vehicle start to hydroplane, don’t panic: Pump your brakes. This gives your car more opportunity to find traction on the road as opposed to a single slam on the brakes.

5. Leave some extra room. You may not be able to stop as fast as usual. Which means—no tailgating. Put a few extra feet between your car and the one you’re following.

6. Don’t weather the storm alone. If you’re not sure about your rainy driving skills, leave it to the professionals and hail an Uber or join the crowd on the bus or light rail. You know what they say: Misery loves company.

7. Don’t worry, because things are heating up. If you’re really down about the rain, fear not: Thanks to global warming, Seattle is going to feel like SoCal before too long. In preparation, keep a spare pair of sunglasses in the glove box. (In the meantime, they’ll come in handy in the event of a surprise sunbreak.)

Related Content

Seattle's Waterfront

Discussions move ahead on the LID, a special tax that will provide funding for the extensive waterfront remodel

Seattle's Chinatown-International District neighborhood

In the Chinatown–International District, an old form of housing has fallen, taking a piece of history—and affordability—with it

University of Washington rowing team history

Plus: How an aircraft carrier supplied electricity to the city of Tacoma for nearly a month

Remembering the Seattleites we lost in 2018