New Book on Mountain Caribou Dives Deep Into Species' Dwindling Numbers

Join wildlife author and photographer David Moskowitz in Ballard for a multi-media launch of his new book, 'Caribou Rainforest: From Heartbreak to Hope'
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Washington-based wildlife tracker, author and photographer David Moskowitz detailed the plight of our state’s mountain caribou population in Seattle magazine more than two years ago. Moskowitz dives deeper into the fragile nature of our dwindling mountain caribou herds in his new book, Caribou Rainforest: From Heartbreak to Hope ($30, Braided River), which he’ll launch at an event on October 23.

Caribou Rainforest is a thorough account of where the species stands today amidst shifting 21st century pressures and challenges. Moskowitz extensively tracked, photographed and studied the caribou in their own precarious ecosystem in the northeast corner of Washington state in order to paint a full picture of the species’ uncertain future and to consider conservation solutions that may prevent their story from becoming a norm.

The book launch will be held at Patagonia Ballard from 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Along with Caribou Rainforest, the event will feature the accompanying film Last Stand: The Vanishing Caribou Rainforest. Moskowitz will be joined by the film’s associate producer, Marcus Reynerson, to discuss the mountain caribou’s endangered status, how we have failed in protecting them and what we can do better to preserve habitats. 7–9 p.m. Free. Patagonia Ballard, 5443 Ballard Ave NW; 206.784.9891; caribourainforest.org

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