By the Numbers: The Special Olympics Comes To Seattle

More than 4,000 athletes and coaches from all 50 states will be here for the Special Olympics USA Games from July 1 to 6
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

This article appears in print in the July 2018 issue. Click here to subscribe.

Join the Special Olympics for the 50th anniversary of its USA summer games, which give people with intellectual disabilities the chance to compete in a variety of sports. The athletes gather in Seattle on July 1 for six days of team and individual events in what’s being billed as the city’s biggest sporting extravaganza since the 1990 Goodwill Games.

Check out the Special Olympics by the numbers:

12:30 p.m
The time when opening ceremonies begin on July 1 in Husky Stadium

2,018
Members of the specially assembled choir that will sing at the opening ceremonies, led by Rafe Wadleigh, director of the Charles Wright Academy choir

1,000
Participants in the first Special Olympics in Chicago in 1968

3,500
Who will take part this year

$0
The cost to view competitions (general admission ticket for opening ceremonies is $20)

9 and 74
Ages of the youngest and oldest athletes

254
Washington participants, the largest state team at the Games

70,000+
Spectators expected to cheer on the athletes

14
Individual and team sports, including stand-up paddleboarding, the most recently added sport

8
Venues hosting competitions, including the University of Washington, Seattle University and Seattle Pacific University

11,000
Volunteers

1,000
Coaches

$76,440,609
Estimated regional economic impact of the Games

 

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