Sneezin’ Season: Seattle’s Seasonal Allergies

By Malia Jacobson

March 29, 2016

An integrative approach may be the best one to take when allergies take hold

This article originally appeared in the May 2016 issue of Seattle Magazine.

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If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably have seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Frank S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Center. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in late winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might want to try an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a good indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.Whether you choose a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a good offense. If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably have seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Frank S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Center. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in late winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might want to try an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a good indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.Whether you choose a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a good offense. 
If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably have seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Frank S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Center. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in late winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.
There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might want to try an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a good indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.
Whether you choose a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a good offense. If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably have seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. 
The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Frank S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Center. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in late winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. 
There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might want to try an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a good indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. 
Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.
Whether you choose a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a good offense. 

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably have seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Frank S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Center. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in late winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might want to try an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a good indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you choose a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a good offense. If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably have seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. 

The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Frank S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Center. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in late winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. 

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might want to try an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a good indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. 

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you choose a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a good offense. 

 

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