6 Books from Local Authors for your Summer Reading List

Seattle-area authors heat up the literary scene this summer with these can't-put-em-down titles
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Sunblock, sunglasses and a great book—such cool things for a blistering hot summer day.

Writer's Digest
has said that it's hard to imagine a better city for writers than Seattle. And these six local authors prove it by infusing a little romance, terror and doom, food for thought, some drama and death and a little hope and reassurance into these summer-ready page-turners. 

1. Language Arts by Seattle novelist Stephanie Kallos. A local family's life is turned upside down by an Autism diagnosis. Kallos talks of parental love, loss and handwriting in a touching and humane light. Kallos is also the author of Broken For You and Sing Them Home. She'll be at Seattle Central Library tonight for a free reading. She will be back at Elliott Bay Books on June 19. This event is ticketed with a portion of proceeds going to support adults with Autism.

2. Of Orcas and Men by local investigative journalist David Neiwert. In this tome, Neiwert discusses the recent ethical concerns about killer whale endangerment due to breeding and captivity. His points are compelling and powerful with an urgent message. Neiwert also emphasizes the need for scientific research on the beautiful and intelligent creatures. He will also be at Elliott Bay Books on June 30.

3. The Edge of Shadows by Elizabeth George. Though her writing is for young adults, it still appeals to a wide array of audiences (come on, you know you read Twilight). It's the third installment to her Whidbey Island trilogy wherein Becca King and her friends are in search for the hand behind a series of dangerous fires being lit on the island. Meanwhile, Becca continues to probe further into her paranormal abilities. For George's tour dates, go here.

4. City of Rivers by twenty-something gamer and engineer turned poet Zubair Ahmed. It's a full collection of 58 poems exploring Ahmed's struggle with being shifted and reshifted around the world. He brings to life the range of human emotion in simple, yet informed words. 

5. Love, Water, Memory by Pacific Northwest novelist and musician Jennie Shortridge. Her novel asks the question 'if you could do it all over again, how would you do it?' After being rescued from the bone-chilling waters of San Francisco Bay, Lucie has no recollection of what happened or who she is; much less that she is going to be married in just two, short months. Although on the surface, it seems like a typical memory-loss mystery, her's is diagnosed as "dissociative fugue" brought on by emotional trauma. At age 39, she is forced to start her life over while following guidance from her heart.

6. Ancient Places: People and Landscape in the Emerging Northwest by Jack Nisbet. Nisbet tells about the unique connectedness between people and places in this corner of the world. Nisbet shares riveting accounts of the floods 15,000 years ago to the controversy over the ownership of the Oregon meteor — events which shaped the Pacific Northwest as we know it today. 

Other booky things going on around here: 

  • Seattle Asian Art Museum is hosting five Indian authors (one from the Seattle area) to converse about their works tonight. Tonight's event is a part of the Eye on India festivals being held all across the U.S. Sip chai with Arvind Krishna Mehrotra, Seattleite, Sonal Khullar and more while exploring their views of ancient, modern and contemporary Indian art at the Asian Art Museum at 6:30 p.m.
  • The Seattle book review and trade company, Shelf Awareness, is 10 years old and celebrates its birthday this year by planting hundreds of free books in the weirdest places around the city on Friday, June 26. The books can be found in places like major pedestrian areas or public transit stops. If you find a book, you can keep it. If you're really lucky, you may find one with a $20 gift card to local bookstores including Elliott Bay Book Company, Third Place Books, Secret Garden Books, Phinney Books, The University Bookstore, The Queen Anne Book Company and Open Book. 
Happy reading!

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